No2030 | Cambodia | Administration | Child Rights Foundation

Support to Child Rights Foundation to strengthen its administration management

The volunteer will assist CRF administrative staff in setting up a filing and coach them in efficient office management.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

      

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Child Rights Foundation (CRF) is a child-focused, not-for-profit, non-political and non-religious Cambodian NGO. It works for full implementation of the UNCRC and other instruments related to childrens issues. It was registered with Government on March 6, 2001.

CRF was established by four Cambodian nationals who have extensive experience in child rights and children and youth empowerment work. They all worked for years for NGOs working with and for children such as Redd Barna (Save the Children Norway), Enfant du Cambodge and Childrens committee, before setting up this local NGO.

Although Cambodia ratified the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child in 1992, Cambodian children are still facing violence against them in their daily lives.
CRF strongly commits to establishing permanent changes in the way that children are viewed, treated and cared for in all parts of Cambodia.

CRF provides child rights education; assists Ministry of Education Youth and Sport (MoEYS) in implementing child friendly school policy; empowers children and youth; strengthens child rights governance within local authorities; improves access to safe water, sanitation and hygiene; and provides child protection leadership and support for schools and communities across the key areas of corporal punishment, child labour, safe schools and migration and trafficking.

Here are CRFs main achievements since its creation:
- Successful integration of 5 child rights related topics: Child Rights (CR), Child Participation (CP), Inclusive Education (IE), Positive Disciplines in Schools (PDS) and Prevention of Trafficking and Sexual Exploitation of Children (TSEC) into the training curriculum of Teacher Training Centers (TTC) being taught nationwide as per curricular,
- Successful integration of CR lessons into Social Study Subject of Students textbook and teachers guidebook for primary school - grade 4, 5 and 6 and being used at public schools,
- Safe School Guidelines officially adopted and launched by MoEYS,
- Around 2,700 in-service teachers and 950 TTC lecturers able to transfer their gained knowledge and skills to pre-service teachers and students,
- Knowledge Attitude and Practice of teachers toward children improved, leading to promote child friendly learning environment contributing to enhance student learning achievement,
- Over 500 vulnerable students supported with necessary means yearly to help maintaining their study,
- Thousands of teachers and students acquired knowledge on hygiene and sanitation and other primary health care,
- In 2010, a childrens report called My Life..., My Suggestions... was produced and presented to the UN committee on CRC, and a child-friendly version on the concluding observation developed and shared to children and relevant stakeholders,
- Target schools equipped with hygiene and sanitation facilities (water storages, well/pump, latrines and hand-washing basins, garbage bins, water filters, first aid kits, sanitary stuff, etc.)

CRF is currently implementing 7 projects as follows:
1. Mainstreaming Child Rights in Schools: with financial support from Plan International Cambodia and close cooperation with the Ministry of Education Youth and Sport, this project is implemented in 124 schools. The project has empowered educational officials (from national and provincial levels), those who are part of the project steering committee, core trainers, and key teachers who conduct echo trainings to members of the school children's council and to all students. CRF capacity building strategies consist of national consultation for training, monitoring and empowerment at the school level, with both teachers and students. Mainstreaming child rights in schools helps to ensure students voices are heard.

2. Strengthening Childrens Voices by Promoting Safe Schools: this project has been implemented for 3 years with the support of Plan International Cambodia, in 4 provinces. Accomplishments at the school level include successful capacity building of school directors, in-service teachers, childrens councils executive committee, School Support Committee and the Commune Committee for Disaster Management on things such as Disaster Risk Reduction, Hazard Vulnerability and Capacity Assessment and development of a disaster risk reduction plan and School Emergency and Disaster Preparedness Plan. The project has directly influenced 12 school directors, more than 100 teachers and more than 4500 students, resulted in significant changes in knowledge, attitude and practices toward promoting school safety and disaster risk management in their respective schools and communities.

3. Empowering Child & Youth-led Groups for meaningful Child Participation in Child Rights promotion and monitoring: with financial support from Save the Children, this project aims at enabling a child and youth network to play a role in promoting awareness on the UNCRC to communities and authorities and promoting the participation of the children themselves in local decision making. To achieve these aims, CRF has conducted simultaneous empowering, capacity building, coordinating and monitoring activities with and through the children and youth network (Cambodia Children and Young People Movement for Child Rights-CCYMCR), - CRF strategic counterpart. To date, a total of 855 children and youths are known to have played an active role in monitoring and advocating for the implementation of childrens rights and expressing ideas on decisions affecting their lives at home and in the community across 16 target provinces.

4. Promoting Child Friendly Learning Environments for a Quality Education : this project was initiated with funding support from Intervita, Italy to enable the target groups to address the widespread problems of child rights in schools. It is a 3-year project and is being implemented in Siem Reap Provinces 2 remote districts, Varin (22 schools) and Puork (2 schools). With full cooperation from the provincial education department and relevant stakeholders such as Provincial Teacher Training Center, school directors, assigned teachers and students, the project has witnessed a significant reduction in the practice of corporal punishment by teachers while a better learning environment has been demonstrated in all targeted schools.

5. Promoting Child Friendly and Healthy Learning Environments: this project forms a part of the CRF new Hygiene and Sanitation Program which started in August, 2013. The objective of the project is to promote friendly, healthy and safe learning environments for boys and girls in the target schools contributing to their accomplishment of basic education as stipulated in Child Friendly School Policy of the Ministry of Education Youth and Sport. In 2014, the project has chosen a primary school in Prek Rokar commune, Kandal Steung District, Kandal Province.

6. Improving Hygiene and Sanitation of Cambodia Rural Schools and Communities: with financial support from Anesvad, Spain the project is being implemented in 50 villages of 3 communes of Angsnoul district, Kandal province and benefits 16,950 people (8,581 female) from 3,605 families of 3,175 households. The project aims to reduce water and sanitation diseases and girls school dropout. It is promoting sustainable practices of consistent use of latrines, hand-washing with soap, and drinking only safe water in rural communities; and developing and strengthening capacity in government, local authorities in promoting improved sanitation and hygiene.

7. Child Sponsorship Program: this project has been implemented in partnership with Khmer-France-Hungary Friendship Orphanage (KFO) and Norway House (NH) since 2007. The objective is to help deprived children overcome the poverty cycle by creating the opportunity to attend post-secondary education that enables children to obtain good careers in the future. The project provides full support to individually sponsored students by covering all related costs such as living and studying costs, transport, accommodation, healthcare, etc. Most of the sponsored students are pursuing university degrees.

As an immediate impact, CRF projects have built the capacity of at least 57 education officers, more than 1,450 teachers, 50,000 students, 700 youth, 86 members of school support committees and commune councillors and 348 parents through various trainings, workshops, meetings and consultations, to equip extra knowledge and practical capability in promoting the application of childrens rights and addressing all child rights-related issues in their environments.
Meanwhile, CRF has built a strong, close and sincere cooperation with the MoEYS, especially with five relevant departments, resulting in the conclusion of a new 5-year term 2013-2017 Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the two entities.

Most of CRF funds come from grant collaborations with International NGOs such as Plan International Cambodia, Save the Children, We World (Intervita), Anesvad foundation, Norway House.
CRF does not benefit from any technical support to date.

CRF implements its projects mainly in 3 provinces: Siem Reap, Tboung Khmum and Kandal, with the help of 30 employees.

To support CRF administrative staff to develop and efficient office management based on a proper filing system.

The aim of the support is to strengthen CRFs administration management, by assisting the administrative staff in setting up a filing system and coach them in office management.

CRF is constantly trying to improve its action and CRF is committed to achieving high standards of quality in its work with children.

CRF quality assurance process means reviewing its program outcomes, updating its policies, investing in staff support and education, and looking for opportunities to expand its programs.

Giving priority to quality instead of quantity means that projects are identified in such a way that specific needs of children are met in a cost-effective manner, and then scaled up to maximize the impact. Working efficiently while building capacity in the children, young people, school personnel and communities whom CRF supports, demonstrates its commitment to providing quality programs within the resources available.

Nowadays, CRF is lacking of human resources as some of its years-long-experience staff retired or moved on to other workplaces. In addition, there is a shortage of fund to have new recruitments and CRF feels its capacity is limited and therefore feels the need of outside experts to help its staff achieving its goals.

In order to establish an efficient administration management system, the Plante Urgence volunteer will work along with CRF 2 administrative staff in order to:
identify their current filing practices and office management and its strengths and weaknesses from which to work (CRF has identified weaknesses, but some good practices could also be capitalised on),
develop an efficient filing system and share practices of good office management for, among others, improved access to documents and data for project implementation
Etc.

Through the contribution of the Plante Urgence volunteer, CRF hopes that it will have more efficiency and effectiveness in its program implementation.

This type of support is available in Cambodia through a few volunteer and consultancy services. However, CRF cannot afford the costs of such services.

Participants / Name: The mission is organised for CRF administrative staff

Participants / Number: 2

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

They understand basic English and can communicate in English. Work will be done in English.

Participants / Training in the field request

They never received specific training on office management.

Airport: Phnom penh [pochentong]

Transfer to the mission site:

The volunteer will be welcomed by Ms. Cheng Sophor, CRF senior admin officer. She will accompany the volunteer to his/her place of accommodation by taxi or Tuk Tuk, which takes about 30mn or longer depending on traffic.

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will stay in a hotel/guest house in the city center of Phnom Penh, in an individual room with attached bathroom.

Means:

The volunteer will work at CRF main office in Phnom Penh.
This office is equipped with computers, telephone and internet, which the volunteer will be able to use.

Logistics:

In general, the mission can happen throughout the year. However, following days must be avoided as they fall on national holidays:
April 14, 15, 16, 2015: Khmer New Year
May 13, 14, 15, 2015: King Sihamonys Birthday
October 11, 12, 13, 2015: Pchum Ben Days
November 24, 25, 26, 2015: Water Festival

CRF official working hours are 8:00-12:00am in the morning and 1:30-5:00pm in the afternoon.

Tuk Tuk will be used for day-to-day travel from accommodation to office. Breakfast and dinners will be taken around the guest house, and lunches will be taken nearby CRF office along with staff members.

No1153 | India | Educational activities | People's Social Development Foundation (PSDF)

Training in pedagogy/animation for creche workers of PSDF

Training the staff to increase the pedagogy and animation skills of the creche workers and improve the quality of education given to children in the PSDF creches

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

      

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

The Peoples Social Development Foundation (PSDF) was created in 1999 by a self motivated group of intellectuals. They wanted to answer to the lack of interest given by the state and mainstream development agencies to the districts of Cuddalore and Villupuram, both in the Tamil Nadu region, even though they are considered to be among the poorest areas of the state. PSDF was set up to tackle some of the challenges the region has to face.
It focuses on helping slum dwellers, dalits as well as poor women and their children.
PSDF aims to:
- support the women community to express their needs and empower them in their overall development through Self Help Groups,
- develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes of youths, women and children through formal and non-formal education and child development programs,
- participate in raising the awareness of the local population to work for a more equal society where people are not segregated against because of their sex, caste, religion or political view
- promote education, welfare and social security for the downtrodden people,
- bring economic self-reliance among the people below the poverty line in rural areas, by motivating them to take income generation self-employment ventures through economically viable, eco-friendly and agro based small-scale industries.
After starting with opening 3 crches with their personal money, PSDF has expanded their actions. It now receives support from the state Social Welfare Board. It has 4 main ongoing programs:
- Crches for poor working mothers: PSDF has 10 crches which each takes care of 25 children from 1 to 5 years old. Lunch is provided to the children and mothers can just drop them off in the morning and pick them up in the evening. This ensures that the children are taken care of while their parents work and that both of the parents can work. Therefore, it contributes to increasing the peoples livelihoods.
- Self-help groups (SHG) for women: PSDF supports the creation of SHGs in order to promote saving habits and entrepreneurial skills among the women and to free them from the clutches of the local money lenders. This program has given them self esteem in a culture which limits them to chores of the home. It has also helped them escape the clutches of moneylenders. PSDFs micro credit plan has already touched 5000 women through its 170 SHG.
- Counselling for women: PSDF has one Family Counselling centre for women to encourage them to talk about their problems and help them solve them. Created in 2007, this centre reaches out to an average of 500 women every year.
- Dalit and women empowerment: Different vocational courses are put into place by PSDF on a regular basis to enhance their beneficiaries income generating activity potentials. These include: tailoring training, batik training, vermi-compost training PSDF has already trained more than 1000 women in tailoring and reached out to more than 50 000 women through their awareness program.
PSDF employs 5 people in their office, 20 crche workers and has 50 volunteer Self-help group leaders.
PSDF is one of the historical partners of Plante Urgence in India. The partnership exists since 2010. PSDFs initial demands were for training courses in animation/pedagogy as well as first aid for their crche workers. Between 2010 and 2013, 5 volunteers have transferred their skills to PSDFs crche workers (2 in animation and pedagogy and 3 in first aid).

PSDF is running 8 Creche Centres in the Rural areas of Pondicherry : 1 at 20 kilometers from Pondicherry and 7 creches in urban slum. 2 education teachers per Creche Centers take care of children . There is 25 children per creche, they come from the same village and are aged 1 year to 5 years old.

Activities done by the crche centers, the children & the education teachers :
- Creche centers open at 9.00 A.M. to 5.P.M,
- The mother who are going for daily labor bring her child and handed over to the crche teacher,
- The children stay in the centre till evening when his mother pick him up : noon 12.P.M. lunch is be provided in the centre ; after the lunch the children take a sleep ; between 4.P.M to 5.P.M. children are allowed to play in front of the centre.

The teachers are Secondary School level, it enough for Pre KG (Kinter Karden School). They were appointed for society, educationally and culturally very backward families in remote villages. Presently, in the creche centers, they are teaching moral stories, basic alphabet, rhymes, numerical, sports. They also provide meals at noon to the children.

PSDF needs to train the teacher center, needs to know how the creche can be maintained in a better way and how to take care of the children in a better way : new techniques and teaching method to the child and pre preparation for child food.

The objective of this mission is double (according to the skills of volunteers) :
- to improve the knowledge in animation for young children: how to make education more attractive, more fun for the children.

- to improve the nutrition food practices of the teachers : Preparation of simple, nutritious and varied recipes (PSDF need to value added nutrition food), hygienic preparation of meals

Food practice at present is to give rice with dal (indian dish) or rice with vegetables.

Participants / Name: Creche Workers

Participants / Number: 10

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

All are women and age is above 18 years up to 35 years.
They speak Tamil and a litlle bit English so a translator will be with participants during all the training.

Participants / Training in the field request

Secondary School level

Participants / Motivation

Participants want to have teaching skills and knowledge in order to use creativity, to improve the crche activities as well as child development.

Airport: Madras [meenambakkam]

Transfer to the mission site:

Pondicherry by car (2h30min from Chennai airport)

Accommodation & food:

Guest House in Pondicherry

Means:

Bock board and a class room in the office of PSDF

No1944 | India | Educational activities | Sharana

Training in pedagogy, animation and hygiene for the creche teachers of Sharana

To support Sharana giving specialized teacher training in Sharanas creches.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

      

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Sharana was established in July 2000 by Rajkala Partha, a Chennai-trained social worker with a post graduate degree in Rural Development from Madras Christian College.

It is meant to address the educational needs of children in Pondicherry and its surrounding villages. Meanwhile a group of volunteers in France created Sharana France, an independent but closely allied organization.

Sharana is a social and development organization acting for neglected socio-economically disadvantaged children. It is devoted to the caring of younger siblings and helps families to increase their income through employment.

The main objectives of the organization are:
- To help children obtain their rights to education, by supporting their families who then do not need to make their children work. That, in turn, means
- To support them to resume their formal education. Via individual sponsorship and collective sponsorship programs, needy children receive a financial support for tuition, books, backpacks, school supplies, healthcare, and homework help.
- To support parents to earn livelihoods, so they can in turn support their childrens right to pursue a formal education.
- To address childcare, medical, nutritional, emotional, economic, and other needs, as well as creating spaces where communities can gather to attend the issues that concern them.

In January 2003 Sharana opened its first Community building housing, a Creche, a dispensary and a meeting room in Angalakuppam which is located about 15 kms from Pondichery, an agricultural and mono-caste village, to free older siblings from the responsibilities of childcare and enable them to return to school. Meanwhile families received a sponsorship to be able to send older siblings to school.

By February 2011, on a one hectare field in Aranganur (20kms from the town off the route to Cuddalore), Sharana launched another project and erected a large building housing a Creche, a Carpentry Training Center, a Spirulina farm, a vegetable garden and a banana plantation.

In January 2012 the Kalki Welfare society, a non-profit organization, started in 2008, merged with Sharana. Kalki was especially working for street children (school drop-outs, working children, HIV-positive children and orphans) in and around Pondicherry.
The aim is to provide protection, education, shelter, health services and recreation to vulnerable children of Pondicherry and Tamil Nadu.

Kalkis Shelter program was started in the year 2009, for children who need protection and safety. The families, who live on the street, dont have enough income to run their family and parents are often addicted to alcohol. The homeless children are facing different problems like dropping out from school, abuse, neglect, physical harassment, especially girls are most vulnerable to abuse and early marriage. The Shelter is now called Sharana Night Shelter. To help these children, it is providing safety, protection and re-habilitation to these children.

46 staff members work for Sharana in the central office on Lally Tollendal street, at the drop-in center in Pondichery, at the night shelter in Morattandy and at the rural centers in Angalakuppam and Aranganur.

There are 9 qualified Social workers, 9 animators, 10 field assistants, 8 teachers, 2 administrative staff and 8 caretakers. There are also volunteers who assist beneficiaries or specific projects and day-to-day activities.

In total, approximately 1300 families are receiving sponsorship assistance from Sharana in 19 Main Areas with 64 sub areas in and around Pondicherry.

To train Sharanas creche teachers in pedagogy, animation and hygiene.

Sharana has 4 creche centers in and around Pondicherry. They take care of children aged from 1 to 5 years old.

The creche teachers were trained when they started to work for Sharana but this was about 10-11 years ago. Therefore, they require some refreshing of their knowledge and skills. They feel like they do not offer enough variety in the activities they put into place for the children. They do not always know how to adapt activities to a childs age and developmental stage.

Although, the creche teachers know how to take good physical care of the children, their knowledge about psychological needs of the children needs to be updated. They also need to learn new activities (educational and recreational) as per the developmental stages of different age groups of children.

Sharana would like them to be trained on different aspects: pedagogy, animation, hygiene, creativity

This type of training is available in India but too expensive for Sharana.

The volunteer will spend the first week of the training just with the teachers. During this time he can cover theoretical training on pedagogy, hygiene, creativity and animation. During the second week, they can visit the creches where the teachers can demonstrate what they have learnt, and the volunteer can also demonstrate how to conduct certain activities with the children.

This schedule could be reorganised depending on when the mission will take place (creches visits could happen the first week).

Sharana would like the volunteer to focus on new creative and up-to-date ways of interacting with the children. They would also like the volunteer to focus on different activities adapted to the childrens different developmental stages.

Participants / Name: 4 creche teachers

Participants / Number: 4

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

The beneficiaries will be the 4 teachers in these 3 creches:
Rani, at the Pondicherry day care centre
Jaya, at the Pondicherry day care centre
Tamil Selvi at the Angalakuppam creche
Gomathi at the Aranganur creche

All of them work everyday with the children benefiting from Sharanas creaches along with also doing some administrative works. They are all women.

Participants / Training in the field request

The teachers teach the children in Tamil and English, (often in Tamil)
All the teachers have a very basic English capacity and are between 25 to 45 years old.
All of them have been trained to work with small children.

A translator, English-Tamil, will be present to facilitate the process and make it more effective.

Airport: Madras [meenambakkam]

Transfer to the mission site:

The volunteers will be picked up by Sharanas car and driver and transferred in a Guest House in Pondicherry. It will take 3 hours from Chennai Airport to Pondicherry.

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will sleep in a Guest house in Pondicherry. Sharana would be able to arrange for a driver and car for daily transfer to the place of intervention.

The accommodation will
offer attached bath room and toilet,
fan,
night & day watch man,
filtered water.

Means:

Note books, color paint, pencils, papers will be available for the volunteer.
Sharana can supply the material.

Logistics:

Working days: 5 hours, 5 days per week from Monday to Friday.
There will be support staff to care of the creches during the teachers absence.
The first day of the training will be devoted to the organization of the work.
The rest of the day can be used to buy the additional material needed or to show the volunteer some of Sharanas projects around Pondicherry.

From day 2, the volunteers daily regular program can start off.

Sharanas driver can be used to pick the volunteer from the Guest house and drop him/her as well everyday.

Comment:

The volunteer will be a person capable of training teachers of our creches. A teacher trainer or a specialised creche teacher.

No1687 | India | Arts | Sharana

Art therapy training for the social workers of Sharana

To accompany Sharana Social Workers in their Art Therapy practice and train them to improve their work with the kids of the Shelter.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

      

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Sharana was established in July 2000 by Rajkala Partha, a Chennai-trained social worker with a post graduate degree in Rural Development from Madras Christian College.
It is meant to address the educational needs of children in Pondicherry and its surrounding villages. Meanwhile a group of volunteers in France created Sharana France, an independent but closely allied organization.

Sharana is a social and development organization acting for neglected socio-economically disadvantaged children. It is devoted to the caring of younger siblings and helps families to increase their income through employment.

The main objectives of the organization are:
To help children obtain their rights to education, by supporting their families who then do not need to make their children work. That, in turn, means
To support them to resume their formal education. Via individual sponsorship and collective sponsorship programs, needy children receive a financial support for tuition, books, backpacks, school supplies, healthcare, and homework help.
To support parents to earn livelihoods, so they can in turn support their childrens right to pursue a formal education.
To address childcare, medical, nutritional, emotional, economic, and other needs, as well as creating spaces where communities can gather to attend the issues that concern them.

In January 2003 Sharana opened its first Community building housing, a Crche, a dispensary and a meeting room in Angalakuppam which is located about 15 kms from Pondichery, an agricultural and mono-caste village, to free older siblings from the responsibilities of childcare and enable them to return to school. Meanwhile families received a sponsorship to be able to send older siblings to school.

By February 2011, on a one hectare field in Aranganur (20kms from the town off the route to Cuddalore), Sharana launched another project and erected a large building housing a Crche, a Carpentry Training Center, a Spirulina farm, a vegetable garden and a banana plantation.

In January 2012 the Kalki Welfare society, a non-profit organization, started in 2008, merged with Sharana. Kalki was especially working for street children (school drop-outs, working children, HIV-positive children and orphans) in and around Pondicherry. The aim is to provide protection, education, shelter, health services and recreation to vulnerable children of Pondicherry and Tamil Nadu.
Kalkis Shelter program was started in the year 2009, for children who need protection and safety. The families, who live on the street, dont have enough income to run their family and parents are often addicted to alcohol. The homeless children are facing different problems like dropping out from school, abuse, neglect, physical harassment, especially girls are most vulnerable to abuse and early marriage. The Shelter is now called Sharana Night Shelter. To help these children, it is providing safety, protection and re-habilitation to these children.

46 staff members work for Sharana in the central office on Lally Tollendal street, at the drop-in center in Pondichery, at the night shelter in Morattandy and at the rural centers in Angalakuppam and Aranganur.
There are 9 qualified Social workers, 9 animators, 10 field assistants, 8 teachers, 2 administrative staff and 8 caretakers. There are also volunteers who assist beneficiaries or specific projects and day-to-day activities.

In total, approximately 1300 families are receiving sponsorship assistance from Sharana in 19 Main Areas with 64 sub areas in and around Pondicherry.

To train Sharanas social workers involved in the shelter program to address and work with children by using Art Therapy technique.

In its shelter program, Sharana is working for the children who are physically, mentally and emotionally affected. Rehabilitation is very important for children who underwent traumatic situations in their life. It is important to address the deep root emotional issues of the children and heal them.

Art Therapy will certainly play a crucial role in reaching out to many of Sharanas beneficiaries as well as the Social workers.

Sharana already conducts an Art Therapy activity in its shelter program.

The current Art Therapy activity is conducted twice a week, any day of week, and is coordinated by one of Sharanas social workers, named Manuel.
It benefits the 36 children who live in the shelter (20 boys and 16 girls). Half of them are below 8 years old, the others are between 9 and 18.

The training conducted by Plante Urgences volunteer will help Manuel to improve his Art Therapy practice and to introduce this practice to other social workers. Currently Manuel is practicing Art therapy through drawing. Him and the other social workers are willing to learn new techniques (through dancing, singing, acting, etc).

Beyond the shelter program, Sharana supports through its projects more than 1500 children per year.
With other Social workers undergoing this training, the number of children beneficiaries will surely be more than a 1000, as this training will allow the Social workers to access more children after the training in various other programs.

Since Sharana has an extensive program to support children to pursue their schooling, vocational training program for school drop outs and children from the street, Art training will help all the social workers.

Participants / Name: 8 social workers

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

The volunteer will work mostly along with Manuel, Sharanas social worker who is responsible of the Night Shelter and current Art Therapy activities.
Manuel is an Indian national. He completed a Diploma in Computer Science and was professionally trained as continental cook. However, after some time, Manuel moved to volunteer work with Non Profit Organization.
He has a 5 year work experience with children emotionally affected. He has undergone professional training on Child Trafficking, Child abuse, Art Therapy and child sexual abuse and prevention.
He is an open dedicated and smart man who speaks English fluently.

The training will help Manuel to improve his Art Therapy practice and to introduce this practice to other social workers.
The other social workers will also take part in the training sessions. All of them are in contact with the beneficiaries on a daily or regular basis:
Vetrivelan : A senior Social worker who oversees all the projects of Sharana
John Peter : In-charge of the Sponsorship Programme
Ravi Anand : Works in the Sponsorship programme
Anbazagan: In-charge of the vocational training for boys who are school drop outs.
Amla : Responsible for the girls programme
Idaymani : Responsible for the drop in centre, outreach and mobile library
Vadivu: Responsible for the drop in centre and early childhood programme

They all work on a regular basis with the children benefiting from Sharanas projects.

Participants / Training in the field request

All the Social workers have a fairly good spoken English capacity and are between 25 to 45 years old.
All of them have been trained to work with children having difficulties. Most of them have degrees in social work, some have more advanced degrees than others. Their levels of experience are also different.

Airport: Madras [meenambakkam]

Transfer to the mission site:

The volunteers will be picked up by Sharanas car and driver and transferred in Pondicherrys Guest House. (2 hours and a half time)

Accommodation & food:


The volunteer will sleep in a Guest house in Pondicherry or in Auroville according to Sharanas driver and car availability for daily transfer to the place of intervention.

The accommodation will
-offer attached bath room and toilet,
-fan,
-night & day watch man,
-filtered water.

Means:

The Shelter is in a large property between Pondy town and Auroville, in Morattandy. Spaces available at the shelter include a large open porch area and a large room which can be organized as needed for the instructor. Similar spaces are available at the Aranganur resource center, which may be an even better location for working with social workers as it is in the midst of agricultural land and other Sharana projects. Meals would be possible in both locations, but easier to organize at Aranganur.

Note books, color paint, pencils, papers will be available for the volunteer. Sharana can supply the material. If a mission requires a different type of material the volunteer will have the possibility to bring some more specialized equipment or supplies with the help of Plante Urgence.
.

Logistics:

Working days: 5 days per week from Tuesday to Saturday, weekend break on Sunday and Monday.
The first day of the training will be devoted to the organization of the work. There will be a 2 hours meeting with Manuel. The rest of the day can be used to buy the additional material needed or to show the volunteer some of Sharanas projects around Pondicherry.

From day 2, the volunteers daily program will be:
10.00 to 13.00: training sessions with the Social workers
Lunch in the Shelter
16.00 to 18.00: applied session with the children plus debriefing with the team and team training according to the daily schedule.

No1723 | Nepal | Arts | Nepal Break Dance Foundation

Training of trainers of NBFs volunteer staff in Hip Hop as a mean to mobilize the youth away from drugs and violence and gain self-confidence

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

      

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Nepal Break Dance Foundation is a Nepali non profit enterprise created in 2008 by Krisada Kanchanawat, the actual director, in order to distract youth away from drug abuse and violence, through involvement in various aspects of entertainment sector such as Hip Hop and youth focused film production.

The volatile security situation in the Terai region (south of Nepal), the unstable political situation (with the dissolution of the constituent assembly, and the lack of a constitution), contribute to the rise in opium cultivation. The growing Indian market via the open border with Nepal has increased demand for opium. The Government report states that on a population of 30 millions of habitants, approximately 80,000 Nepalese are addicted to drugs.
In order to fight against that, NBF has held a strong policy of all its events promoting Say No to Drugs and Violence and other social issues.

The main objectives of the project were to prevent youth from drug abuse and violence through skill training and employment generation, to involve youth in social issues through means that are interesting to them. And establish NBF as a production house covering both entertainment program and technical production units.

Nepal Break dance Foundation is in the process of institutionalising the annual Himalayan International B Boying/B Girling Jatra (in Nepali Jatra means festival; and B Boy/B Girl is the short term for break dancing) promoting a specific social issue such as Say No to Drugs and Violence. NBF has managed to organise the Jatra for two years consecutively 2010 and 2011. In 2010 three Thai B Boys were invited for the Jatra, and in 2011, the Jatra hosted 3 French B Girls.

NBF raised funds with support of Rotary Club of Mount Everest since two years.
The aim from the beginning was to make the studio, where they are working, financially independent by making it a socio-enterprise by charging training fee for those who could afford it and by offering scholarships for the marginalised or especially committed and talented.

Today NBF has taken the next step towards establishing a film production unit which will produce youth focused entertainment programs. Youth are being trained in technical skills such as cameraman, light man and script writer. The entertainment part has already gone ahead with the B Boy/B Girl performances, which also addresses social issues such as gender based violence.

Different activities could be learned and done by B boy/girl as providing skills training in entertainment sector (Hip Hop elements: B Boy/B Girl dancing; beat boxing; rapping, graffiti and hip hop theatre (choreography, music)). Providing skills training in technical production such as: camera operation, script writing, lighting, logistics and editing.

NBF plans upcoming activities:
Training by professionals: film production with focus on youth entertainment; elements out of Hip Hop: break dancing and theatre.

From now around 200 people benefited from the actions: the B Boy / B Girl, the crew members, the youth who can have trainings in hip hop and others activities. This is a small framework with 4 employees, who are B boys instructors. And with 4 persons who work on full voluntary basis and are responsible for running the organisation: director, marketing, linkage and networking, choreographer & B Girl instructor.
In Nepal caste and ethnicity are a big issue. In NBF youth and children come from all caste and ethnic groups. What becomes the most important is that they are able to practice and improve their skills in dancing. Their crews are not based on caste but on their skills and commitment to learning the skills of B Boying/B Girling. As gender is also an issue in Nepal and girls are not supposed to do B Girling, NBF declared 2012 a year of scholarship for all girls wanting to learn B Girling. This has increased the number of girls attending from 10 to 50. The youth and children are coming from all over Nepal. Some of them came to study in Kathmandu; some are looking for a job.
The age group range of youth and children in NBF is from 8 to 25 years. The age range 15 to 25 has been marked as high risk group vulnerable to drug abuse, HIV&AIDS and violence. This is the reason why NBF does not make its target group exclusive to only economically marginalize.

To teach both the skills and the principles of Hip Hop to the youth involved in NBF.

Todays youth and children of Nepal were either born or grew up as adolescents during the ten-year violent conflict that affected the country from 1996 to 2006.
Following this conflict, the lack of opportunities or daring to dream are factors that contribute to frustration, leading to attraction to drug abuse and violence among the youth and children. The 10 year civil war has taught the youngsters that violence is the way to get what you want, even if it means hurting someone else to fulfil ones wishes.

Hip Hop attracts youngsters with its 4 elements (DJ, MC, Breakdancing and graffiti culminating in HipHop Theatre) and at the same time gives the message that the 4 Principles of Love, Peace, Unity and Fun are the right attitude. Therefore NBF wants to give the youth international professional Hip Hop figures who believe in the 4 Principles as role models.

Hence this mission could be beneficial if Planete Urgence could help in bringing in the volunteers.

The 4 Principles of Hip Hop (LOVE, PEACE, UNITY AND FUN) and the 4 Elements of Hip Hop (DJ, MC, Breakdancing and graffiti culminating in HipHop Theatre) are a powerful combination for attracting youth to a constructive and fun way to express their feelings about their own situation, their community and society. It is also popular amongst Nepali youth. However, misconstrued ideas and lack of knowledge about the principles of Hip Hop need to be removed.

Nepals Hip Hop culture is still coming of age and NBF needs Hip Hop artists who are committed and promote these 4 principles through the 4 elements, while Break Dancers with strong background and knowledge in Hip Hop culture is not available in Nepal.

NBF is therefore looking for Hip Hop artists with in particular skills in break dancing, good knowledge and commitment to the 4 Principles and ability to teach young people both the skills and the principles of Hip Hop.
NBF itself cannot afford to access expert profiles as sent by Plante Urgence, and such volunteers will help NBF provide professional services to the youth, which will encourage them to take their message seriously.

The intervention of the volunteer should enable youth members of NBF to have a clear idea about the 4 Principles and 4 elements of Hip Hop. They will particularly learn skills or enhance existing skills in break dancing that will make them more professional.

Expected results
- For participants
The consequences and changes that NBF expects from the mission is to have a clear knowledge of the 4 Principles and elements of Hip- hop, understand the concept and how to serve and raise awareness in the community using this knowledge.
The changes after the mission would be to build up capacities in their personal life as well as for the organization, build up confidence and use the knowledge in a better and a useful way.
- For the organisation
Having a clear concept of the above mentioned i.e. when the participants have a good knowledge of say Breaking or MCeeing it would be better for the organizations because participants participating in this mission will be able to teach and spread the 4 Principles and 4 elements of Hip-hop to other students in the organization and outside.

Participants / Name:

Participants / Number: 20

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

NBF has two target groups:
1. B Boys/B Girls who are NBF members and have been doing break dancing and also teaching in some cases.
2. Students who are learning break dancing at different levels.

Around 20 persons will take part in this mission out of which around 8 are Girls. Their age range is from 13 years to 25 years.

They have a fairly good knowledge of written and spoken English.

Participants / Training in the field request

They are college and school students and youth who are working. They have never been trained in Hip Hop, they learnt on their own.

Participants / Motivation

Participants hope to gain improved break dancing skills, strengthened with strong and clear knowledge about Hip Hop culture and its principles, to make them professionals. This will help them gain respect from mainstream society.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

The volunteer will be welcome at the airport by a member of Nepal Break Dance Foundation who will bring him/her to the hotel in Kathmandu by taxi (around 20 minutes).

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will sleep in a guest house Hana Hotel, which is one minute walk from NBF office, located in Thamel area (the touristic and very dynamic area of Kathmandu).

He/she will have a private room and bathroom.

The volunteer will take the breakfast at the hotel, and the other meals can be taken in NBF office (Dal bhat, Noodles, momos). There is a kitchenette on the balcony. The volunteer can also have lunch in restaurant; there is wide choice of eateries in Thamel.

Means:

A sound system is available, and the volunteer will have access to the dance room of NBF, equipped with mirrors. Microphones and other material depending on the element the mission will focus on can be provided (turntables, paint...). The only thing that cannot be found in Nepal are the special tips for paint sprays necessary for graffiti).

Other equipment available in the office room are a desk and one laptop; and a flip board with stand (where newsprints can be clipped on or used as a board for writing with board markers).

There is electricity when there is no load shedding, but a generator will be rented for the training if necessary.

An internet connection will be made available.

Logistics:

The volunteer will work during the mission from the accommodation site to the training site, which is very near.

The mission will take place all the day - 5 days a week for 2 weeks with an average of about 6h of activities per day (interaction with the youth, exchanges/preparation, with NBF staff management).

Comment:

Profile of the volunteer: an experienced Hip Hop artist, with advanced skills in the element of Break Dancing, but also knowledgeable of the other elements and committed to the 4 Principles of Hip Hop (LOVE, PEACE, UNITY AND FUN).

No1923 | Nepal | Arts | Down Syndrome Society Nepal (DSSN)

Art therapy training for the teachers of DSSNs day care centre in Kathmandu.

To train in art therapy the teachers of the Satyam day care centre in Kathmandu and the teachers of their day care centre partners coming from different places in Nepal.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

      

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Down Syndrome Society Nepal is an NGO created in 2010 by Shila Thapa and 8 other parents of intellectual disabled children. DSSN protects and promotes the basic human rights of the intellectually disabled children.

Despite how relatively common Down syndrome is, in Nepal it is not understood as a chromosomal disorder. Nepalese doctors and nurses are often not well informed and lack basic understanding of the symptoms; leading to tragic misdiagnosis. Often children are not properly diagnosed and never treated as they should be. As Down syndrome is associated with many serious physical problems (heart defects, poor eyesight, etc.) that demand urgent care, the lives of many Downs children are simply lost without access to relevant medical practitioners and counsellors.

Shila Thapa, the founder of the organization, lost her brother to meningitis at age six as her mother was not educated enough to react in the right way. That was a powerful lesson to Shila: mothers need education and access to care for their children.
In 2002, Shila gave birth to her second child. After a lengthy struggle and multiple consultations with doctors, her son was diagnosed with Down Syndrome and a heart condition.

Following this and due to lack of treatment in Nepal, Shila had to go to India in order for her son to undergo operations for his survival. This allowed her to learn more about the condition and Down syndromes support groups in India.

Back in Nepal, Shila had to train herself in physiotherapy to be able to answer to her childs need and this led her to open a clinic to support other children with Down Syndrome.

In 2005, she founded the Down Syndrome Support Centrethe first in Nepal, now called Satyam Day Care Centre (SDDC).
Thanks to her mother-in-laws support, Shila was able to cater to her sons need and to other needy children with Down Syndrome, whose parents cannot afford treatment. And so, in 2010 she started Down Syndrome Society Nepal with the help of other parents, especially of mothers.

Since 2005, in a country where a word for Down syndrome does not exist, Shila has reached out to parents, the medical community, the government and a network of citizen organizations (COs) working with disability, to make children with Down Syndrome and their parents a vibrant, empowered community with the resources and education to improve the lives of their children and influence Nepalese society.

Shila has employed a two-pronged institutional strategy by operating a support centre and day care centre, as well as partnering with other disability groups and lobbying the government of Nepal.

The support centre is responsible for sensitization programs on Down syndrome amongst parents, medical practitioners, medical institutions, educational institutes, and the government. Shila informs professionals and the general public that Down syndrome is not a disease but a genetic condition.

In Nepal, children with Down syndrome are viewed as retarded, dangerous, and even mad and their mothers are often discriminated against and ostracized. Through programs organized by the centre, Shila is creating spaces where children with Down syndrome and normal children interact and learn from each other. She encourages families and society to celebrate these children and their talents. She does not force activities, but develops their natural talents.

The centre organizes public programs as a mean to raise funds while increasing awareness and also includes celebrities and lawmakers in her awareness programs. In-kind support is provided by volunteers who offer many therapies to the children while large organizations contribute with equipment, books, donation boxes and business-plan consulting to Shila.

The support centre also runs a vocational training program for children over twelve-years-old to enable them to become economically productive members of society.
Named Prothshaan, this program focuses overall on enhancing the lives of people with Down syndrome and people with intellectual disability, providing quality instruction and meaningful work.

The centre provides Physiotherapy, an Early Stimulation Program, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy and routine vaccinations to the children. The centre also provides classes, music and dance therapy, exercise, and other services to Downs children.

Currently, Satyam day care centre supports 15 children or young adults with Down Syndrome or intellectual disabilities and touches around 250 families via 15 partner day care centres.

The current Satyam Day Care Centre services are:
- Special education: education of the children in adapted way for each one.
- Medical general check-up and support for special medical needs.
- Speech therapy done by Shila as she has attended a workshop in Singapore.
- Dance therapy done by a Nepali volunteer twice a week.
- Music therapy done by a Nepali volunteer once a week.
- Occupational therapy: day to day activities which means life skill, daily routine activities.
- Physiotherapy done by Shila who follow a course for a year.
- Self Help Skills: division among the children of daily work as cleaning, cooking, washing clothes.
- Early intervention: detection of Down syndrome and activity with young children (sensation of cold/hot, texture, noises).
- Physical Training and Sports.
- Educational tours: recreational activities out of the centre one Friday a month to claim the Right to go out (cinema, park).

12 persons are working in the centre: the director (Shila Thapa), the principal of the centre, 4 teachers, 1 supervisor, 1 administration officer, 1 driver, 1 cooker, 1 kitchen assistant and 1 office boy.

3 teachers have received a teacher training from the Japanese Cooperation but not specifically in special education.

A new teacher has been hired from end of March 2014. She has received training in early childhood stimulation and on how to develop activities for children with various disabilities.

The principal of the school also acts in the education program and has received a Montessori training.

The 15 children coming daily to the center are from 4 to 25 years old :3 have 24 and 25 years old, 3 have between 14 to 16 years old. The rest of them are from 4 to 12 years old.

To train in art therapy special teachers working with children and young adults with Down Syndrome or intellectual disability.

DSSN has a team of 4 teachers in their day care centre in Kathmandu and has 15 day care centre partners all over Nepal that DSSN helps to start.
The members and founders of the organization and some of the teachers are the parents of the beneficiaries of the centres. They are doing their best to give maximum support to their children and help them to develop as much as possible their capacity.

They believe that art therapy can play an important role to develop and enhance the cognitive capacities of children with intellectual disability.

At the moment two Nepali volunteers, acting as extras to the teachers, carry music and dance activities with the children and youths but they dont have any idea to manage it in a therapeutic way. The teachers and/or parents involved in the center do not know either about art therapy.

That is why a training in art therapy, in a very simple and practical way, will help them to understand the concept of art therapy, what can and will be the benefit for the children and youths of the centres, how to carry different activities in a therapeutic way and how to adapt the current activities as well.

Really often people in Nepal think that art therapy is to carry recreational activities but do not know to conduct these activities in a therapeutic way.

For all these reasons, DSSN is requesting a training in art therapy from Plante Urgences volunteer(s).

DSSN also does not have the required funds to attend this kind of training.

This training in art therapy will be organised for the 4 special teachers of Satyam centre in Kathmandu, the principal and the director of DSSN. Some of them are parents of the children.

Prior to the Plante Urgence volunteer(s) intervention, DSSN will also consider the possibility for some of its board members and staffs from partner day-care centres to join the training. This possibility will be discussed along with the volunteer(s) to determine the most efficient schedule and number of participants accordingly.

The majority of the participants will be women.

For possible participants from the partner day-care centres located outside of Kathmandu valley (10 out of 15), Satyam Day Care Center will arrange for the accommodation and the meals in the centre.

DSSN suggests that the intervention of the volunteer is divided daily into two different sessions:
- One theoretical session including general presentation of art therapy, concepts of art therapy, artistic approaches in therapy to develop creative potential, methodology to manage activities, interpretation.
- One practical session with the children of Satyam day care centre through the organization of different activities like theater, tales, clown, fine arts, voice activities, dance, masks, etc.

Several missions may be required for the staff to acquire all the necessary skills.

After the mission(s) DSSN is expecting the following results:

For the participants :
All the participants wish to take part to the training to learn about the concept of art therapy and learn to manage artistic activities in a therapeutic way, which will help the children and youths to develop their capacity.
After the training(s), the teachers and board members of the day care centres will know about the concept of art therapy and will have a clearest idea about the benefits of art therapy for children with disabilities.
They will feel more comfortable and will be able to manage art activities with the children and youths in a therapeutic way.
The participants might use these new skills at home with their children as well, and share them with other parents or teachers of partner day-care centres.

In the long term DSSN hopes to see evolutions in the behaviour of the children and youths.

For the organization
DSSN hopes to improve the support they give to the children and youths.
As DSSN is working as well on the concept of inclusive education, it hopes that after the training its teachers will also be able to train other teachers from normal school around the centre on art therapy, which might be really useful for the children of these schools, who have personal issues as well. DSSN is thinking to organize inclusive activities in art therapy with neighbouring schools.

Participants / Name: 4 teachers + principal + director of DSSN.

Participants / Number: 6

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

Minimum 6 : 4 teachers + principal + director of DSSN.

To be determined with the volunteer: 1 or 2 staffs of partner day-care centres (around 10/15 centres) +. some board members.

Just few of them speak and understand English, an interpreter will help, either among the staff, or hired externally.

Participants / Training in the field request

None of the participants have received a training in art therapy.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

Shila Thapa will pick up the volunteer at the airport in a private car. It will take approximately 30-40 minutes to accommodation, depending on traffic.

Accommodation & food:

The Plante Urgence volunteer(s) will stay at a guesthouse in an individual room with private bathroom, electricity and free wifi. The guesthouse will be located in the touristic area of Kathmandu, Thamel.

Means:

The Plante Urgence volunteer(s) will work at the DSSN day-care centre in Baluwatar, Kathmandu.

DSSN has an office with 1 desk and 1 computer with the Internet.

DSSN does not have an electricity back-up. Electricity short-cuts vary depending on the time of the year.
There is a paper board.

Music instruments are also available: drum set, guitar, keyboard, Mouth Organ, Nepali instrument Harmonium, Madal and Sarangi.

As well as games: Badminton, Basket ball, Shot-put, Carom board and puzzles.
There are only limited art materials.

All this material can be used by the volunteer(s) during the mission.

Logistics:

The mission can happen anytime expect during national holidays: Dashain and Tihar (weeks 40 and 43).

All daily transportation can be done by walking (15 to 20 minutes) or by taxi.

The volunteer will work from 10am to 5pm from Monday to Friday. He/she can work on Sunday as well, which is a working day in Nepal.

The volunteer can have lunch in the centre. Breakfasts and dinners will be taken outside in restaurants.

Comment:

DSSN is looking for volunteer(s) with a degree in art therapy and with experience in managing group/individual art activities.

No1946 | Nepal | Arts | Voice of Children (VOC)

Training on the topic of ART THERAPY FOR KIDS for Voice Of Childrens staff members

This training in art therapy will allow to build the capacity of VOCs psychologist, social workers and children activities facilitators in order to ensure a quality psychosocial support to the most deprived and vulnerable children targeted in the different programmes of VOC.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

      

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Voice Of Children has been created in 2000 by Krishna Kumar Thapa, the current Director, to support street children.

Krishna Thapa was working in one organisation providing care and study facilities to street children. When he left the organisation, the children requested him to still take care of them. After consultation with his friends, and thanks to their support, the NGO was created. Krishna has an educational diploma in sociology and has experience as a Child Rights activist. He has been involved in the Child Rights sector for 18 years.

According to the National Alliance of Organisations for Street Children, the number of street children in Kathmandu is estimated at 1,500. This figure is certainly under-estimated as additional children arrive in the streets every day. These children live off collecting garbage and begging. Half of them use drugs and 85% have been subjected to sexual violence.

Overall, the population of Nepal is young (65% is less than 30 years old) and under-qualified: 44% of the population and 56% of women are illiterate. Due to the lack of education and vocational training, these youngsters are the most vulnerable on the job market. This is even more so for young adults from disadvantaged families. Without a job, or holding low-skilled jobs, these youngsters struggle to escape the vicious circle of poverty.

VOC was created to tackle the street children phenomenon and to support them through rescue, rehabilitation and reintegration. VOCs target is Children at risk, Street Children, Sexually Abused Children.

The organisation works all over Nepal according to the permanent residence of children's families.
In Kathmandu, VOC intervenes in four different zones: Kankeshwori, a slum in UN park, Jadibuti and Patan.

VOC hires in total 60 employees, from office to field staff (3/4 of the staff is active in the field).

To achieve its objective, VOC has two different programmes, a Street Children Programme and a Programme against Child Sexual Abuse, and implements several projects, all interrelated:

- Children at risk, for which VOC is supporting poor families capacities to solve problems on their own in order to progress towards increased autonomy, stability and reduced poverty, and strengthening the child protection mechanism in the community, covering about 1,000 families, equiv. to 4,400 persons...
- Rescue, for street and sexually abused children. This project generates the awareness to the children living/working in the streets about the risks of street life and motivates them to leave the street life. VOC operate through street work and Drop-in Centers and caters to 1,100 children through these outreach activities.
- Rehabilitation, focuses on preparation of 120 children for their sustainable future and prepare for family and community reintegration. The children stay for short term in a preparation centre where they upgrade their education level and improve their life skills, make future plan and are prepared for sustainable reintegration with family and community.
- Reintegration, with family, community or foster family. VOC follows up the families and help them to build their capacity to care for their children (150 were reintegrated in 200 families, this programme supporting overall 880 persons). For children without a family, VOC provides nutrition, accommodation, education and job placement.
- Economic development. VOC supports 150 children/youths and their family for economic development by providing vocational training and referring for job placement or by linking with the organisations working for savings, micro-credit and entrepreneurship development.
- VOC also provides Psychosocial Support to 1,100 children at risk, street children, children victims of sexual abuses and their families

In addition, VOCs work and visibility help build overall the awareness of 600,000 persons on sexual abuse (students/teachers/Social Workers/Doctors/Hoteliers, Police).

VOC receives technical support from Enfants et Dveloppement, a French organisation, for social projects: methodology, counselling skills, etc and for institutional aspects, as management, good governance, fund raising, etc.
VOC has several donors to run its activities: Enfants et Dveloppement and Partage from France, ECPAT from Luxembourg, Child Rights from Netherland, World Childhood Foundation and the European Union.

To train the psychologist, social workers and children activities facilitators of Voice of Children on ART THERAPY FOR KIDS.

VOC wishes to build the capacity of its staff members in order to ensure a quality psychosocial support to the most deprived, vulnerable children targeted in its different programmes based on the social status of their families and the cases of abuse and of children living in the streets reported to VOC or observed through outreach in the communities.

Activities in Art therapy have been experienced in a project of Enfants et Dveloppement in Cambodia with positive results.
While taking part to an inter-country seminar in Burkina Faso, VOCs team showed interest for this activity, but ED does not have the mean to provide specific trainings to VOC in Nepal, because of the lack of professionals in this area in the country.
VOC is really interested to offer an efficient and adapted psychosocial support to the children (at the moment VOC only provides individual counselling and psychosocial family therapy).

The children that would benefit from the Art therapy activities are children for whom the children activities facilitators detect uneasiness, which will be confirmed by the social workers and for which all the team will work on with the child and his/her family.
These children are at risk, some not going to school, some attending school irregularly or underperforming at school, living half in their home and half in the streets, children living in unsafe environments (with alcoholic, violent or careless parents), and children victim of different kinds of abuses.

The participants to the training wish to develop their capacity to work with those children in an effective way.

Afterwards they will be able to identify children in suffering more easily, the children will be referred for home/family support to other social workers, and will be followed-up through Art Therapy activities. The improvements will be readable with an Art therapy indicator tool that will be implemented during the mission through the transmission of knowledge on how to assess the changes and improvements of the children (see below).

VOC expects from the trainer:

- A specific training in Art therapy to the VOCs psychologist. According to the evaluation done by the trainer about the Psychologist level, he/she will give theoretical skills to the Psychologist to improve her art therapy practice and make her able to support after the training the social workers and the children activities facilitators.

- A practical art therapy training to the social workers and the children activities facilitators. They must be able to conduct Art therapy activities with deprived children or children at risk under the psychologist monitoring:
-> Drawing and painting;
-> Expression of emotion from the drawing;
-> Communication;
-> Analysis of Arts;
-> Colour Psychology.

They will also be able to train other children activities facilitators afterwards.

At the end of the mission, VOC expects that:
- The social worker and the children activities facilitators will be able to analyze children behaviour and suffering through Art therapy activities,
- The social worker and the children activities facilitators will be able to help and support the children in suffering through Art therapy activities,
- The social worker and the children activities facilitators will be able to assess the changes and improvements of the children.

VOC expects that the social workers and the children activities facilitators will provide an effective work with the children for their development and protection, and that their creativity will develop. They will be able to organize activities related with art and colours with the children.

Participants / Name: Social workers, psychologist and children activities facilitators

Participants / Number: 16

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

The mission will be organised for the 12 social workers, the psychologist and the 3 children activities facilitators of VOC who directly work with the beneficiaries (street children, children at risk, and children victims of abused, vulnerable families).

The 12 social workers provide psycho-social follow-up at home, conduct social centres activities (mainly individual counselling), work in network with the available service providers and refer the families, hold group discussions and awareness sessions.
The 3 children activities facilitators manage the activities with children as recreational activities, parents/children activities for children under 5, remedial classes, group discussion, individual counselling, and child club activities.

Participants / Training in the field request

Only the psychologist has received previously training in art therapy but it was only an introduction to the basics of art therapy activities and she does not have the knowledge on how to implement overall an art therapy programme and to assess the results, as requested for this mission.

The participants of the training speak English, few only have basic English. A VOC staff will translate during the training.
The participants have between 20 and 40 years old and are 50% men and 50% women.
They all have College degrees from Intermediate to Master Degrees

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

A staff will welcome the volunteer at the airport. It will take between 30 to 45 minutes to reach the place where the volunteer will stay according to traffic.

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will stay in a guesthouse or VOCs or Plante Urgences office according to his/her preferences. All are equipped with individual rooms and bathrooms and the Internet.

Means:

The volunteer will work in VOCs office in Sanepa, Lalitpur.
VOC office has a board, computers equipped with Office 2007 and an internet connection, a video-projector.

Logistics:

The volunteer will work from Monday to Friday from 9:30 am to 5 pm with flexibility.
Depending on the accommodation place, the volunteer can come to office by walk or by taxi.
The volunteer will have lunch at VOCs office, breakfasts at VOCs office or in the guesthouse and dinner in restaurants.

Comment:

Art Therapy trainers are difficult to find in Nepal and the curriculums in psychology are new in Nepal. Therefore, VOC requests from Planete Urgence the support by a professional in art therapy, expert in the relevant domain.

No1991 | India | Arts | St. Jude India ChildCare Centres

Training in Dance therapy for St Jude Childcare centres staff members

St Jude Childcare centres would like some of its Mumbai staff members to be trained in dance therapy in order for them to be able to use it with their beneficiaries.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

      

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

St. Jude India Childcare Centres was founded in 2006 by Mr and Mrs N. Kaviratne, an Indian couple from the corporate world who had spent a large part of their lives working in different countries for multinational companies.
St Jude India Childcare Centres focuses on providing accommodation to children suffering of cancer and their families.
Families living in small villages and towns in different parts of India bring their children diagnosed with cancer to large hospitals in cities for treatment. The hospital treats them at low cost but they often do not have a place to stay. These children do not have a safe hygienic place to stay or nutritious food to eat to help them recoup from the rigours of cancer treatment. Parents often abandoned treatment because of these issues.
St .Jude India Childcare centres aim to fill the gap between what the hospitals do to treat children with cancer and the holistic care they need to heal. It provides hygienic surroundings, nutrition, transportation to the hospital, educational, recreational activities as well as counselling and therapy to these families.
The first centre was created in Mumbai out of the founders personal funds and started by looking after 8 children under treatment for cancer and their families.
In 2014, St Jude runs 11 centres all over India (7 in Mumbai, 2 in Kolkata and 2 in Delhi). They are currently looking after 130 children and their families and are expecting to have 200 families in their care by the end of 2014.
Overall since their creation, they have cared for over 800 children diagnosed with cancer and none have abandoned treatment after coming to them.
All the services are free of cost to the patient and the family. All the centres are located in close proximity of the treating hospitals.
St Jude India Childcare centres are funded by individuals, corporations and trusts such as for example the R. Jhunjhunwala Foundation, the McKinsey Kinderhilfe, the Tata Memorial Centre, Unilever, Sodexo, Nestle, the Janish and Shirin Grizder Trust, the Jacobs Charitable Trust and many others. They are funded by more than 130 different entities.
In 2014, St Jude Childcare employs 110 people: 50 paid employees and 60 volunteers. Their team members are mostly professional experts in their field which provide their services free of cost.
The organization has received multiple awards from different institutions: Rotary Club, AmeriCares India, QIMPRO
For more information: http://www.stjudechild.org/

To train St Jude Childcare Centres staff in dance therapy so that they can use it to help their beneficiaries overcome the stress of their life situation.
St Jude Childcare Centres beneficiaries are going through difficult and stressful times. The sick children as well as their parents need to overcome depressing situations. To support them in overcoming these stressful times, St Jude Childcare centres puts into place different recreational and cultural activities (games, painting, sport, outings) and they have access to therapy sessions.
Having seen the benefits of art therapy through dance and music in partner organization they would like their staff to be trained in art therapy to complement the services they already offer to their beneficiaries.
Putting into place dance therapy sessions for their beneficiaries will increase the level of interpersonal relations between the staff and the beneficiaries and hopefully increase their positive attitude towards the illness.
In the future, they would like their staff to be able to work with dance therapy on an ongoing basis with their beneficiaries.
Dance is a very popular art form in India but dance therapy is not yet readily available.

The volunteer will have to start with a general presentation of dance therapy, concepts of dance therapy, artistic approaches in therapy to develop creative potential, methodology to manage activities, interpretation.
During the volunteers intervention, sessions with the children and adult beneficiaries of St Jude Childcare centres will be put into place in order for the participants to witness and participate in practical implantations. The beneficiaries for whom the dance therapy sessions are aimed are 5 to 14 years old sick children and their parents aged 20 to 35 years old.
The volunteer will have to offer culturally appropriate dance therapy training.

Participants / Name: The participants will be Mumbai Centre Staff who deal with the beneficiary families every day.

Participants / Number: 12

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

The participants will all be women. They are between 25 to 40 years old.
They speak English.

Participants / Training in the field request

The participants will have at least a high school certificate. They have never received training in this field.

Participants / Motivation

Learning something new brings in a fresh energy. Something which is a form of therapy can serve to release stress.

Airport: Bombay [sahar (santa cruz) international airport]

Transfer to the mission site:

A taxi driver known to the organization will pick up the volunteer from the airport. It is a 45 minute drive to the airport.

Travels from the accommodation to the mission site will take around 20 minutes by taxi.

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will stay in a hotel in Mumbai. They will have an individual room with an attached bathroom and electricity. There will be no internet access but there are internet cafes next to the hotel. A Mosquito repellant machine can be provided.
Breakfast and dinner can be taken at a restaurant near the accommodation and lunch at a restaurant near the mission site.

Means:

Whiteboard, paperboard, computers with Windows 8, video-projector and Internet connection will be available for the volunteer to use.

Logistics:

The mission can happen at any time during the year except during national holidays. The dates that need to be avoided are 15th August; 29th August - 7th September 2014; 25th September 4th October 2014 and 23-25th October 2014.
The intervention will take place at the Parel centre in Mumbai or at the Kharghar centre in New Mumbai depending on when the mission takes place.
The volunteer will work around 5 hours everyday from Monday to Friday.

No2041 | India | Arts | People Craft Training Center (PCTC)

Dance/ Art therapy training for the social workers of Peoples Craft Training Centre (PCTC)

To train PCTC Social Workers in Dance/Art Therapy practice at Thirvannamalai, accompanying them toward autonomy with the objective for them to lead sessions with disabled children of PCTC day care center and Integrated Child Development Service (ICDS) Centers.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

      

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Peoples Craft Training Center (PCTC) is a non profit organization formed in the year 1991 by Mr. Xavier Mariadoss. PCTC is registered as a Trust. Xavier Mariadoss has a B. Sc in chemistry, PG diplomas in Non formal and adult education and in Health and Development obtained in the USA. He was between 1994 and 1996 the executive director of the rehabilitation of disabled person program in India for Handicap International.

PCTC was created to provide rehabilitation services to the people affected by Polio. Later the services were expanded to other disabilities.

PCTC is working with the deprived people / people with disabilities / women and children and it works towards collective self-reliance and total development of people through community participation.
Women empowerment program, community health program, Children development program, Skill training and Employment opportunities are some of the PCTCs initiatives to address the needs in the community. Every activity initiated by PCTC is in response to the felt need of the people in the community.

While PCTC advocates self-reliance for people, it ensures that the strategy evolved for implementing the program includes a sustainability plan, quality and link between all the initiatives and is complimentary in nature.

PCTC is operating in one Developmental Block of 124,000 persons in Tiruvannamamalai District. The operational area is located 200 Kms south west of Chennai. The name of the Block is Thurinchapuram, which has 47 panchayats (village council) and 102 villages consisting of 274 habitations. This is a drought prone area, receiving below average rain fall. 70% of the people are agricultural laborers. 20 % of the people own land. They are only small and marginal farmers owning less than 1 acre of wet land or 2.5 acres of dry land. Rearing animals is a secondary occupation in this area. There is a big migrant group from this area moving to the cities Chennai, Bangalore, Mumbai and Tirupur. This has big impact on people.

The staff of PCTC executive team is composed of Mr. Xavier Mariadoss who is the CEO, Mr Viajayarah the director of Rehabilitation who is working with Mrs. Genova Micheal the coordinator of rehabilitation program.
PCTC works with local consultants for their programs. Dr Kirubakaran is the consultant for community health program and Mr. Elumalai is the consultant for the thulir program.
PCTC worked in the past with volunteers from UK, France and Switzerland. They were non professional volunteers, only one was a physiotherapist.

PCTCs activities are funded by the interest of its Corpus Fund (the capital of the organization, the permanent fund) though PTCT farm, quilt sales etc.
PCTC receives a financial support of Quakers from Netherland through regular donation.
Mr. Meier from Swizerland contributes to the corpus fund and to special projects. 2Bears charity-UK contribute to PCTCs children development projects (2Bears is registered as a UK NGO, it has a mission to support the work of local charities in Southern India).
PCTC is part of two big networks, the Tamil Nadu Voluntary Health Association and the Tamil Nadu coalition past 2015.

Since its creation PCTC has set up:
- A live data base of 2042 people with Disability in the entire district
- A micro credit program for a population of 124,000
- 16 acres of land as model farm where organic farming is being practiced. It is also being used for the neighbouring farmers as a place of demonstration in innovative farming practices. Six acres of the farm land has fruit trees. The rest of the land is used to cultivate paddy, vegetables and rearing of animals and is used as a training place in agriculture for disabled adolescents
- A full fledged Rehabilitation workshop for people with disability, a day care centre and an early intervention center for children with disability.
- Three primary health centers in Thurinchapuram, Narthampoondi and Mangalam.
- 106 Integrated Child Development Service (ICDS) Centers.

The Community Based Rehabilitation program for the 2,042 people with disability is one of ongoing activities of PCTC.

PCTC is providing opportunities for rural children for personality development and co curricular activities for 180 children (Thulir childrens program).
PCTC is also promoting renewable energy in the area of operation and educating people on climate change adaptation techniques.
They are as well promoting native medicine-Sidha System of medicine among people (community herbal gardens in the villages, preventive health care for children with disability, training for health workers, student doctors program (kutti Marthuvar) among school going children).

10,500 women are involved in the women empowerment program through self helps groups. 27 teenage girls are involved in the skill training and Employment opportunities in the women empowerment program. 45 women also work in the quilt unit.

Every activity initiated by PCTC is in response to the felt need of the people in the community.

To train PCTCs social workers, who are between 22 and 45 years old, involved in the rehabilitation program to address and work with children with disabilities by using Dance/Art therapy techniques. They will get professional knowledge and ability to practice art therapy.

These therapies will be very effective for children with disability. In its rehabilitation program, PCTC is working for mentally retarded children, Children with Cerebral palsy, multiple disabilities. They are working with 34 children every day and also with 60 children on a monthly basis.

Thanks to the acquired skills, more disabled persons will come with interest to utilize art/dance therapies from PCTC staffs.

These kinds of professionals are not available in PCTCs working area so beyond PCTCs programs, many other people will come and utilize PCTCs staffs to transfer their knowledge.

Dance therapy:
The volunteer will transmit the ability to make observations and analysis from children behaviour and from their danced movement.
He/She will provide theoretical and practical course in a first time. Then, he/she will co-lead sessions with PCTC workers with the aim to accompany them toward autonomy. He/she will transmit the skills of observation/analysis/feedback and tools which will permit PCTC workers to evaluate and develop their sessions with the objectives to develop children welfare.

PCTC workers will regularly use these techniques in rehabilitation program and it will become their regular part of work schedule, so many people will utilize the staff resources.
It will benefit the 10 PCTC social workers, some of them had theorical input. And indirectly, it will also benefit the children of the day care center and Integrated Child Development Service (ICDS) Centers.

The training conducted by Plante Urgences volunteer will also help PCTC workers to introduce this practice to other social workers.

Art therapy:
PCTC workers must be able to conduct Art therapy activities with disabled children:
- Drawing and painting;
- Expression of emotion from the drawing;
- Communication;
- Analysis of Arts;
- Colour Psychology.

At the end of the mission, PCTCT expects that:
- The social workers will be able to analyze children behaviour and suffering through Dance/Art therapy activities,
- The social workers will be able to help and support the children in suffering through Dance/Art therapy activities

Participants / Name: social workers

Participants / Number: 10

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

They are 22 to 45 years old. 3 of them are working for PCTC for 10 years and more, while 4 of them are working for 3 years and 3 of them for only 1 year. They have been selected on their motivation on 15 persons. They dont have any experience in the field of dance/art therapy.

Participants / Training in the field request

Some of them speak English. A translator could be helping for those who dont speak English. Most of them are college graduates or matriculates.

Airport: Madras [meenambakkam]

Transfer to the mission site:

The travel time will be around 4 hours from Chennai Airport. It will be done by car.

Accommodation & food:

The accommodation during the assignment will be in the PCTC center.
The volunteer will be in an individual room with the attached bath room, electricity connection, completed coverage on mosquitoes
Breakfast, lunch and dinner will be taken at the PCTC office dining hall.
The room is on the PCTC campus so no transportation will be required everyday to reach the mission location.

Means:

White board, black board, pens, markers, papers, chart papers, video projector, computers with Windows 7, internet connection and any other training material required will be available.

Logistics:

The training will take place at the PCTC office located in the Tiruvannamalai District (kondam-Karivandal).


Volunteer can choose to organise the training any time between 9.00 to 5.00 from Monday to Friday, with one hour lunch break.

No2068 | Nepal | Arts | Antardristi Nepal

Training in ART THERAPY for kids and youths for Antardristis staff members

This training in art therapy will allow building the capacity of Antardristis staff directly in contact with children and young women victim of sexual abuse within their family or community, in order to ensure a quality psychosocial support.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

      

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Antardristi was established by a group of Nepali women in 2003. They started the NGO after their visit to a police station that highlighted that the cases of sexual abuse and their victims were given very little consideration. Indeed, anytime a case of sexual abuse is registered, nobody would seem to be able to address the child or womans mental state. Therefore, the founders of Antardristi decided to work on sexual abuse issues by providing psychological care to children and young women, among other things.

Antardristis mission is to prevent sexual abuse of children and young women and promote improved mental health among minors. It facilitates community outreach activities for teachers, students and communities of Nepal. Antardristi seeks to raise awareness in schools and dispel traditional perceptions such as blaming the victim. It aims to foster social change in the area of mental health, in which the individual is often stigmatized. The organization also empowers and supports child survivors of sexual abuse through psychosocial counseling.
Antardristi also understands the need for reaching out to adult survivors of sexual abuse (SA) in order to support them in an adequate manner and prevent any further re-victimization as well as enable them to heal from the impact of sexual abuse.

The goals of Antardristi are:
- to raise awareness of, empower against and hence prevent sexual abuse,
- to provide psychological and rehabilitative intervention for families and survivors impacted by sexual abuse,
- to provide outreach and support community integration, following the process of rehabilitation.

The current activities of Antardristi are:
- Awareness programs in schools, communities in Kaski, Syangja, Myagdi, Makwanpur Chitwan and Jhapa,
- 1 day teacher training in Kaski, Syangja, Myagdi, Makwampur, Chitwan and Jhapa,
- General campaigns and street drama to raise awareness on the issue of SA in Kaski, Syangja, Myagdi, Makwampur, Chitwan and Jhapa,
- Psychosocial and rehabilitative interventions for families and children and young women impacted by sexual abuse. Antardristi has 2 centers and one transit home. The transit home in Kathmandu has been opened in 2007, one center in Pokhara opened in 2008 and one in Hetauda opened in 2010. 3 children/young women can be accommodated in Kathmandu, 15 children/young women in Pokhara and 20 children/young women in Hetauda.

By November 2014, Antardristi has rescued 15 children from different part of Nepal and has reintegrated 6 children into their home. Those children whose family reintegration is not possible were sent to Antardristi network organizations.
Antardristi is getting funds from Danida (Denmark's development cooperation) for its awareness program for 2 years. For the survivors, Antardristi is getting funds from individual donors both national and international.

Antardristi is operating its programs in 20 districts of the 75 of Nepal and received cases from 20 different districts from far Western region of Nepal to Eastern regions.

Antardristi employs 14 staff and 2 part times.

To train the counselor, outreach coordinators, residential in charge from the safe home, program manager and reintegration officer of Antardristi on Art Therapy for kids and young women.

Antardristi is working in a really taboo sector, especially in Nepal, which does not help to treat the cases; the staff is really interested to offer an efficient and adapted psychosocial support to these children and young women, whose trauma is really deep.

As Antardristi is working with sexually abuse children and young women, this training will help its staff to make beneficiaries describe and express their feelings and traumas more easily and therefore decrease their anxiety.

Antardristi has experimented, while working with children and young women, that only doing counseling sometimes is not enough to disclose the traumas. The team believes that it will be easier if they offer the possibility for their beneficiaries to express their feelings in a different way, without speaking.

It will help them to work more efficiently by using a different kind of therapy.

The participants to the training will be the staff directly in contact with the identified cases; as the counselor, the reintegration officer, the program manager and the residential in charge of the safe home.
The outreach workers are the people who are giving awareness classes in different areas of Nepal. While giving these awareness classes, they also find out cases so their participation in the training is as well really important and will allow them to provide initial counseling there also.
The residential in charge of the safe home will be able to establish a follow-up thought Art therapy and the improvements will be readable with an Art therapy indicator tool.

At the end of the mission Antardristi expects that:
- The staff will feel more confident in their work and they hope to be able to identify quicker the root cause of the traumas and therefore support the cases as soon as they are identified, to reduce their pain, anxiety and their unsafe feelings,
- The staff will be able to develop and organize activities related with art,
- The staff will be able to analyze children behaviour and suffering through Art therapy activities,
- The staff will be able to assess the changes and improvements of the children.

The trainer will train the staff of Antardristi on:
- Theoretical skills about Art therapy, how to develop Art therapy practices, how to assess changes and establish a follow-up,
- Practical Art therapy sessions to allow Antardristi staff to conduct Art therapy activities:
-> Drawing and painting,
-> Expression of emotion from the drawing;
-> Communication;
-> Analysis of Arts;
-> Color Psychology, etc.

Participants / Name: The mission will be organized for 7 staff of Antardristi.

Participants / Number: 7

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

They are 6 women and 1 man, between 28 to 42 years old: 1 counselor, 2 outreach coordinators, 2 residential in charge from the centers, 1 program manager and 1 reintegration officer.

They all speak English.

Participants / Training in the field request

- Yogita Chapagain, Master in Sociology (program manager)
- Ramchandra Lamichhane, Master in Public Health, running (outreach coordinator)
- Samikshya Bhujel, Master in Account running (residential in charge)
- Megha Magar, Diploma in Account (Reintegration Officer)
- Rajani Bharati, Master in Psychology running (counselor )
- Rina Shrestha, Diploma in Sociology (outreach coordinator)
- Kalpana Sharma, School level Certificate (residential in charge)

Antardrist staff has already received an expressive Art therapy training for 5 days, where they learnt meditation, observing game, energy exercises, facilitation skills, inside outside drawing, connection drawing, listening exercise and tree of life.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

A staff will welcome the volunteer at the airport. It will take between 30 to 45 minutes to reach Antardristi head office in Patan and/or reach the accommodation on the first day according to flight schedule.
The second day the volunteer will go by jeep with the team to Hetauda, which is at a 4 hours drive from Kathmandu (district of Makwanpur).

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will be accommodated with the team in a rented home in Hetauda. The volunteer will have to share a room with one woman staff. There will be no attached bathroom. There will be electricity, but not 24 hours as Nepal experiences power cuts every day for 2 hours on average. The volunteer can use an Internet connection in the safe house.

Means:

The volunteer will work in one of the Antardristi safe home where abused children are accommodated, in Hetauda, out of Kathmandu valley. Mostly there will be 18 to 20 children. Most of the children will be in school from 10 am to 4 pm.
This place has a white board, computers with windows XP, an Internet connection and video-projector.

Logistics:

The volunteer will work from Sunday to Friday from 10 am to 4 pm with flexibility. The volunteer can work on Saturdays as well.

The mission can happen anytime of the year except during the festival of Tihar and Dashain, in weeks 43 and 46 in 2015.

From the accommodation place, the volunteer will come to the safe home with the staff by walking; it will take 5 minutes.

The volunteer will have the meals at the safe home with the team. At 9 o'clock the volunteer can have Nepali lunch, which is rice, vegetable, pickle and lentil soup, at 2 o'clock the volunteer will have snacks and at 7.30pm the volunteer will have dinner. If the volunteer wants to have lunch outside of the safe house, he/she can but will have to inform the staff in advance.

Comment:

Antardristi would like a professional in Art therapy, expert in the relevant domain.

No1743 | India | Handicraft | Navskshitij

Training in handicraft making for the staff and residents of Navkshitij centre for mentally challenged adults

To help the staff and mentally challenged adults living in the Navskshitij center to improve their workshop products.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

      

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants


Navskshitij was funded in 2003 by a couple of medical doctors: Dr. Neelima Desai and Dr. C. R. Desai, both having a deep interest in the problems of the mentally challenged persons. Navskshitij is an NGO working for the inclusion of mentally challenged adults. Its main objective is to offer mentally challenged adults a home for a lifetime and a life filled with happiness, dignity, and self-respect, to which they have a right. It aims at rehabilitating them back to society and at offering their families a stress-free living.

Navskshitij receives financial support from private companies based in India, both national and international.

Navskshitijs home for mentally challenged adults is based in Marunje, a village on the outskirts of Pune city in the state of Maharashtra. Although Maharashtra has several government and private and NGO-managed special schools for mentally challenged children, there are very few services for mentally challenged adults. And residential facilities for mentally-challenged adults are even fewer. Mentally challenged adults are dependent on their families which very often cannot afford it. Navkshitij was established with this idea of providing a dignified life to the mentally challenged adults through transfer of skills according to their ability, providing opportunities for wider exposure to the world and lead a healthy community life.

All the organizations activities are aligned towards these objectives. Since its creation Navskshitij has been setting up a residential cum workshop facility now welcoming 36 inmates. The NGO organizes annual holidays outside Pune, including out of India. It also sets up an Adventure Club for mentally challenged persons and organizes activities like high altitude trekking in the Himalayan region, para sailing, para gliding, etc. Navskshitij is paying attention to make its beneficiaries constantly interact with the mainstream society. It is also raising awareness about the problems of mentally challenged persons and about what they can do when they are given support.

The need is great, but residential facilities are expensive and need lot of financial as well as human and technical resources, so Navskshitij cannot host a big number of inmates. Currently there are 36 inmates, 11 female and 25 males.

In its residential center, Navskshitij is organizing three types of activities for its beneficiaries:
1. Workshop activities: making chocolates, candles and floaters, tie & dye products, paper lanterns, handmade paper bags and eco-friendly jewellery.
2. Adventure Activities: High altitude trekking, jungle trekking, monsoon trekking, moonlight trekking, trekking in the hills and forts near Pune; Climbing Competition Parvati Hill close to Pune; Holidays outside Pune; Participation in sports competitions held by other organisations for the mentally challenged.
3. Music, dance and drama classes, performances for an invited audience, and the Annual Natya Mahotsav, a Drama Competition for mentally challenged people.

Navskshitij is willing to expand its activities and open a second shelter unit to be able to help 60 mentally challenged adults and their families.

To train mentally challenged adults and staff of Navkshitij in handicraft making to improve the quality of the products made in the workshop.

Navskshitij wants to improve the quality of the handicraft produced in its workshop. For the moment candles, lanterns, chocolates and paper bags are being produced.
The products are sold by requesting companies, or housing complexes through personal contacts to allow them to put up stalls on specific occasions/festivals. But products are not sold in the open market but only within Navkshitijs network of individuals and companies. The residents receive a symbolic remuneration of 50 rupees per month for participating in the handicraft activity.

Due to a lack of adequate funding the organization cannot employ paid professionals for training the staff and improve its skills. Nevertheless there is a need for new techniques and ideas to improve the creativity and quality of the workshop activities. Staff members need new ideas to make the workshop activity more stimulating for the inmates. For this reason Navskshitij required the intervention of a Plante Urgence volunteer.

Navskshitij needs a Plante Urgence volunteer with good skills in product designing and packaging.

The volunteer should be able to train the workshop staff/teacher in the organization to make attractive products, new kinds of candles, lamps or any other simple products which can be made by hand, without using machines or specialized equipment. Handicraft making is the main skill that the volunteer should have.

The volunteer will work both with residents and with staff members of the center. The residents have low mental capabilities but neither physical disability nor serious mental illness.

Residents work in the workshop between 11 am and 4 pm. The volunteer will work with them during this time and the rest of the day will be devoted to single work or group working sessions with staff members only.

Expected results
For the participants
New skills in handicraft making (staff and residents)
New techniques to teach the residents (staff)

For the organization
Improvement of the workshop activity, better personal development of the inmates.
Better visibility and greater demand for Navkshitij products.

The mission can happen between July and October and again between mid-November to April end. Navskshitij staff is taking holidays at Diwali and during summer.

Participants / Name:

Participants / Number: 16

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

The beneficiaries will be six workshop staff/teachers of Navkshitij and 10 residents. They are men and women from 19 to 46 years old.
Staff are trained in working with mentally challenged at the workshop.

Participants / Training in the field request

There are three certified special educators in the team. They can speak English.

Participants / Motivation

The mentally challenged beneficiaries need to learn new skills for making products in the workshop. This will upgrade their skills and improve the sales of their products. More products also means keeping them busy for a longer time. This discipline will help them to get a good chalked out routine on a daily basis.

Airport: Poona

Transfer to the mission site:

The volunteer will be picked up by a taxi hired for him (1 hour and half)

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will be given a room with attached bathroom in the Navkshitij center.

Means:

There are four rooms in the center available for the workshop activities.
The Plante Urgence volunteer can use them.

There is also raw material for the products currently being made at Navkshitij: candles, paper lanterns, jewellery, chocolates, handmade paper bags, key chains. Other material can be bought for the mission according to the volunteers project.

Logistics:

Working schedule: Monday to Friday, between 10.30 a.m. and 7 p.m., with a break between 1 and 2 p.m. and again 4.30 p.m. to 5.30 p.m.

The whole mission will take place in the Navkshitij centre. The Plante Urgence volunteer will take his meals at the centre.

Comment:

The volunteer should not necessarily have an experience of working with mentally challenged adults but must be willing to do so.

No1751 | Zambia | Database | Chikumbuso Widows and Orphans Project

Database creation and training

Creation of a comprehensive and detailed database for the Chikumbuso Widows and Orphans Project and training of Chikumbuso managing team in using this database.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

      

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Chikumbuso project was created in January 2005 to address social and economic distress caused by HIV and AIDS pandemic in the Ngombe community. Chikumbuso means "rememberance".
In fact, 15% of Zambian adults are infected by HIV and have already left behind more than 800,000 AIDS orphans. In Ngombe compound in Lusaka, where the project is located, extreme poverty is very common and HIV/AIDS prevalence is 15.2% of 15-49 year olds according to 2007 statistic from UNICEF. The pandemic causes the major breadwinners to sicken and die, and extended families to expand to take in nieces and nephews. It is therefore very common to find a widow struggling to support more than ten children in a one or two room block house with little or no opportunity to work and make money.

To address these issues, Chikumbuso was created as a grassroots project, providing an alternative lifestyle to the most vulnerable women and children in the township. Chikumbuso provides free schooling for the children, as well as adult training and capacity building, income generation activities and community building programs.

Chikumbuso was founded by an American expatriate, Linda Wilkinson, and a Zambian lady, Gertrude Banda. The project began as a small income generating project with one widow caring for seven children. Today, the project supports over 70 widows, 20 grandmothers, 30 young adults and 350 orphans.

The projects comprises:
- A micro-entreprise for widows: Over 70 widows have learnt how to crochet recycled plastic bags to create hand bags. This activity gives them new qualifications, a regular income, and a safe place to work from. The bags are sold in a store at the Chikumbuso Community Center. Chikumbuso also ships bags overseas for purchase in various countries, mainly the United States. The bag sales are the cornerstone of Chikumbuso. Bringing the widows together to work on a community project is also very useful as it makes the once debilitating AIDS stigma fall off and the widows have a safe place to talk about their HIV status.
- A community school: In 2006, Chikumbuso opened the school with 30 students. Today, there is a full grade 1-6 program educating about 350 students. In Zambia today the government schools are full and overflowing and the opportunity for orphans to go to school is slim.
- A tailoring and cooking skills training program, STARY (Skills Training for at-Risks Youths), with 30 young adults who have left the streets of the slum and learn new skills in both tailoring and cooking.
- A Grandmother program, sponsoring 20 grandmothers, in the slum around Chikumbuso, by providing to their daily needs through sponsorship and a caregivers program.

Chikumbuso has several partnerships with US local churches that provide direct assistance to our Grandmother caregiving program. We also work with several small boutiques in the US that sell bags on our behalf.
It counts 23 employees and 6 local volunteers, with an average of 25 volunteers per year dropping in. Chikumbuso has 70 members that do not pay any membership fee.

Annual budget of the association was around 158 000 USD in 2011. 90% of Chikumbusos budgets comes from donations, sales and sponsorships made from the USA, where the founder of the project is actively fund-raising and selling bags. Only 10% of the budget comes from donations and sales within Zambia, which raises issues about the sustainability of the project itself.

Chikumbuso Community actions regroup various projects, including two sponsorship programs that require very close monitoring and management. The managing team of Chikumbuso being overwhelmed by other activities need a very efficient database to help with day-to-day management of the programs. Chikumbuso currently uses an excel database, created about 5 years ago. This database, although useful presents a lot of challenges to Chikumbuso managing team, making them lose lots of time and efficiency:

- The database is only accessible from one laptop located in the project premises, while the managing team is working both from Lusaka and the USA. This system becomes highly complex as the managing team has to regularly save the database, in case the laptop crashes or gets lost. The project therefore is looking at having an online database.

- The database only comprises the school students and their sponsors, while much more information is needed to properly monitor the evolution of the project:
1. the widows must be included in the database together with their family and housing situation and linked to the children they are looking after, to give a comprehensive picture of the family situation
2. In a similar way, the income of the families, the production of the widows should be included in the database by being linked in some way to a system for sales and inventory.
3. The sponsored grandparents should be included, together with their sponsors for an efficient follow-up of the sponsorship activities
4. Other Chikumbuso members, linked to the students or the widows should be included in the database, for example, employees like teachers and teacher assistants.
- The database does not allow for comprehensive details about every student/ members: the students stories, when available, are displayed in a box for comments, which does not allow for uniform reports and easy access
- The database can only support one picture per page, while we would need to upload scanned letters, and videos
- The database does not allow for monitoring of payments, while we would need to have centralised information about sponsorship payments and deadlines
- The links between the students and their sponsors databases are broken, leading to mistakes while managing the sponsorship program

These challenges cannot be overcome by the Chikumbuso project as none of its employees or volunteers have the required skills to create a new database. Although Chikumbuso tried to have professionals to assist on this, the costs involved were impossible to be paid by the project.

The expected outcomes of this mission are:

- The new database is created
- The managing team is able to use and update the new database

The objective should normally be achieved after one mission for the project team.

The volunteers mission should enable the creation of an online database, more comprehensive and detailed. This should be done in partnership with Chikumbuso managing team, which must also be trained on how to use the new database.

Expected results at the end of the mission(s)

For the participants:
At the end of the mission, participants will be able to use all the functions of the online database, update and extract all types of information from it based on protocols set up with in the program for security and safety of data.

For the organization:
At the end of the mission, the training has enabled the structure to use a more efficient database, monitor the evolutions in the families situations, the state of play of every sponsorship especially the deadlines on payments and have an online complete report on all Chikumbuso members.

Participants / Name: 5 members of the Chikumbuso project team

Participants / Number: 5

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

Beneficiaries are part of the Chikumbuso project team:
- President of Chikumbuso Community project & School Administrator
- Secretary of Chikumbuso Community project and officer in charge of the distribution of food
- Chikumbuso librarian and sponsorship program assistant
- Chikumbuso assistant teacher and sponsorship program assistant
- Chikumbuso Managing Director

They are 5 women aged from 23 to 46 ; they speak fluent English.

One of the beneficiaries has a good computer literacy and knowledge of the current database. Four of them have basic computer literacy.

Participants / Training in the field request

All the participants has a Grade 12 level, which corresponds to end of secondary education.

Participants / Motivation

They all expect autonomy in using the new database (updates, monitoring, follow-up on payments), for updating and extracting information on a daily basis.
Some of them also expect the mission to be an opportunity to practise and reinforce their IT skills in general.
The Managing Director particularly expect to be able to train the part of the team based in the USA the founder and other staff members and volunteers to use the online database.

Airport: Lusaka [lusaka international airport]

Transfer to the mission site:

Chikumbuso will organise the reception of the volunteer from Lusaka airport with their office vehicle, accompagnied by a member of the project team. It takes 25 minutes from the airport to the office and accommodation, depending upon traffic.


Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will be accommodated at Zebra Guesthouse, which is very near from Chikumbuso office.
Free wireless internet service is available in the guesthouse.

Chikumbuso provides lunch for everyone every day. Breakfast and dinner are offered at Zebra Guesthouse. There is also a wide variety of restaurants available within 4km at a local mall called Arcades.

Means:

The training will take place within Chikumbuso premises, in Lusaka, Zambia.
Equipment available for the training: Laptop, Internet connexion

Logistics:

During the mission, travels from the accommodation to the training site will be performed by the office vehicle, with a member of the team. The Guesthouse is very close to Chikumbuso office.

Hours of training: from 10:00 am to 12:30 and from 14:00 to 16:00 (Monday-Friday)

Comment:

The volunteer should be:
- IT specialist, with experience in online database designing
- Fluent in English

The mission should take place as soon as possible.
The center is closed during holiday period, from 12th Decembre to 12th January.

In a second phase (second mission), all the teachers could be trained to use the database, so that they would be able to update by themselves the data related to their pupils.

No2071 | India | Database | Centre for Womens Development and Research

Support to create a database to monitor the progress of the Centre for Womens Development and Researchs activities and womens development.

Build a database and train the staff of the CWDR in South Chennai to use it in their daily work for the Parivarthan programme as well as all their other programmes.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

      

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

The Centre for Womens Development and Research (CWDR) was initiated in 2004 by 3 women activists: Mrs. K.R.Renuka, Mrs. Gowri and Mrs. Siddamma. All three had experience of working with different NGOs. Mrs. K.R.Renuka, the Managing Trustee, had completed her M.Phil Micro-Level planning from Gandhigram University. She had 3 years of experience in working with NGOs while initiating CWDR. Now she has 20 years of experience in womens development activities. During 2004, she had also completed the Human Rights Advocates programme from Columbia University, New York.

The three founding trustees realized that most of the womens development activities were designed and implemented by men and at that time only 2% of NGOs were headed by women. So they felt the need to create a women headed organization to address womens issues. The goal of CWDR is to create a Gender just society. CWDR addresses issues like gender discriminations, violence against women, Girl childrens rights and single womens rights. They are now working with women domestic workers, single women (destitute, widows, unmarried) and adolescent girls.

They help them to achieve economic independence and educate them about womens empowerment. They involve in advocacy and campaign activities to bring in suitable policies for women domestic workers, single women and adolescent girls. They also provide up-graduation skills for domestic workers, entrepreneurship skill trainings for single women, life skill, sexuality education and career guidance for adolescent girls.

They have initiated Manushi, a trade union for domestic workers; Maithri, an association for single women and Snehidhi, an association for adolescent girls. Recently they have also started working with adolescent boys to address the issue of violence against women.

Manushi is a trade union, the first in Tamil Nadu for domestic workers. Manushi actively advocates for government regulation of domestic work, which is part of the informal sector. A welfare board for domestic workers was initiated by the government thanks to Manushis advocacy and campaign. Nearly 500 domestic workers were given skill up-gradation training and found job placements. There is a 100% increase in their salaries. More than 1000 single women initiated or strengthened their small business activity and increased their income. At the local, level Manushi and Maithri members have formed a watch committee to address the violence against womens issues.

Earlier, CWDR used to run 12 evening non-formal education centres for drop outs, now all the girls in their area are going to schools. In the rural area usually the girls are not going to college because there is no college nearby, now girls think about their career and go to colleges far away from their villages.

The CWDR is directly supporting 5000 domestic workers, 2000 single women and 2000 adolescent girls. They are working in 85 slums of Chennai city and 24 villages of Edaikazhinadu panchayath or Kancheepuram district, Tamil Nadu.

People living in the slums are the poorest people of the city or they are BPL-Below Poverty Line people. Most of these people are migrants from southern districts of Tamil Nadu.
Due to regular droughts and agriculture failure, these people have migrated to cities in search of employment. The main occupations of slum people are construction work, causal labour, street vending of vegetable, fruits and eatables, domestic work, scavenging. All these occupations come under the unorganized sector as there is no regulation of these work, so they work long hours to earn Rs. 200 to 400 per day (2,5-5). Finding employment in the cities itself is a big challenge, their employment is not regular, and there is no social security scheme for them.

In the CWDR target area, the poorest among the poor are the single women and domestic workers. There are about 12 000 women domestic workers and 11 000 single women in their working area.
Most of the single women are involved in domestic work. Domestic work is often a modern form of slavery hidden and silenced in private houses. Domestic work is normally characterized by low wages, excessive hours of work with no extra pay, overwork, lack of benefits or social security, unfair termination of employment and employer abuse. Sexual harassment of domestic workers is a common complaint. They are one of the most exploited groups of unorganised workers. On average, domestic worker earn Rs.1500-3000 (20-40) per month.

The office of the CWDR is located in Thiruvanmyiur, South Chennai. 24 persons are working for the CWDR.

Major projects of the CWDR are supported by Andheri-hilfe Bonn for up to 90% of their funds. In addition to funds they also provide training support. From 2014, Shadhika, an organization from USA, is also supporting the Girls to Graduates project.

To accompany CWDR in the development of an efficient and useful database to improve the management of their programmes.

In the framework of the Parivarthan programme, which aims to set up a job service placement for domestic workers, training them in housekeeping to propose their services to the Chennai middle class households and more globally for all their programmes, the CWDR would like to create a data base which would help their field workers to collect data about their beneficiaries and to use it effectively.

Thanks to the creation of a data base, their work will become more focused, effective and transparent. It will permit them to improve the quality of their reports and to reduce the time taken to implement planned activities. It would also increase their confidence.

Currently the staff of the CWDR is not using any database. The CWDR is looking for smartphone applications that the staff can use to collect, save and send data. CWDR would like its staff to collect houses visit data, meeting reports etc.

In the office most of the data is kept as hard copies on paper. If a person requests for a housemaid services through Parivarthan, the CWDRs staff have to search for that, and usually they even do not refer the data on paper. They go to the slums and enquire on who is interested. Sometimes they do not find the information.

A data base would permit to collect information on each domestic worker, like her education, experience, training, expectations, phone number, to use it through a smartphone and even to provide her profile to the employer.
The use of ICT -Information and Communication Technology- in their work would help field workers and coordinators to reduce the wastage of time and resources like money and human resource.

This will contribute to improve the quality of the service provided by CWDR to the beneficiaries of its Parivarthan project as well as households of the Chennai middleclass and beneficiaries of other programmes.

It is very difficult and expensive to get this type of training locally.

The training conducted by Plante Urgences volunteer will help CWDRs staff to create, manage and use a data base of their beneficiaries, which will permit them to increase the efficiency of the data collection process as well as the use of data.

Staff members of the CWDR understand how important it is to have IT skills and will use it for their data collection and education purposes.

The Plante Urgence volunteer will train the 4 coordinators and they will themselves train 20 field workers to use the database in their daily work. Therefore, the assignment will benefit the 4 coordinators but also 20 field workers indirectly.

At the end of the mission, CWDR expects that:
- The database will be created
- The coordinators will be able to manage in autonomy the data base and teach to the field workers how to collect/update datas from their smartphones, tablets and laptops
- The staff will be able to make queries

Several missions could be necessary to achieve these objectives.

Participants / Name: Coordinators

Participants / Number: 4

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

They are all women, aged from 20 to 50 years.

Participants / Training in the field request

They all speak English and are post graduates. They know how to use a computer.

Airport: Madras [meenambakkam]

Transfer to the mission site:

The volunteer will be welcomed by Mr. Balakrishnan (CWDR's coordinators and Mrs. K.R.Renuka's husband). The transfer towards the accommodation will take 30-45min by car.
If he/she arrives at midnight, the driver of the CWDR will come to the airport to welcome him/her.

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will stay in the office guest room, which consists in an individual room with attached bathroom, electricity, Internet access and a mosquito net.

Means:

The training will take place in the CWDR Chennai city office.

The Chennai city office is equipped with a white board, 5 computers with Windows 7 and Office 2007, Internet, a video projector.

Logistics:

The mission can happen all through the year.
The working hours will be the same as the staff workers from 10 am to 4 pm, including an hour long lunch break.

The volunteer will be staying in a room in CWDR head office, so no travel will be needed.

No2158 | Nepal | Database | Care and Development Organization (CDO)

Database creation and training of CDO team members on the use of it.

Creation of a simple database for the different projects of CDO Nepal and training of CDO Nepal field workers and management team in using this database.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

      

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Care and Development Organisation Nepal has been founded on 2005 by two main persons with the help of nine board members.
Arati Basnet, the current director of the organisation, has done her master Degree in Social Science and has actively participated in social services since her school days in India.
During the Nepalese Civil War (from 1996 until 2006) many people have been internally displaced to Kathmandu. The plight of these destitute people many of them orphaned children affected Arati deeply. It was her intense compassion for these people that led to the creation of CDO Nepal.
Pradeep Singh Suwal, the current program officer of the organisation has been studying in US herbal medicine and medicinal plants. Back in Nepal, in his home town Godavari where most of the projects of CDO Nepal are, he has decided to work toward the goal of improving the quality of life of displaced people and underprivileged children in Nepal.
CDO Nepal has been established to relieving the distress of people living in extreme poverty and works to improve the lives of underprivileged people, families working in brick and carpet factories, internally displaced people and women in need.
Through their hard works and determination, CDO Nepal has provided access to health and education services to more than 70,000 people and their children. Since its foundation in 2005, CDO Nepal has grown into a well-recognized and appreciated relief organization in the Kathmandu valley,
CDO Nepal has currently 3 projects in brick factories:
- Mobile Health and Awareness program (MHCA) for 18 brick factories where they are providing health check-up, supply free medicines, provide health counseling, health awareness and training, and accompanied the serious patients to hospital on medical expenses of CDO Nepal.
- Safe Motherhood and Child Care (SMCC) for 18 brick factories where they collect data of children immunization below 2 years, do awareness of ANC (antenatal care), PNC (Postnatal care), safe motherhood, nutrition & vaccines, provide vaccines in coordination with Nepal government, provide training of nutrition food and accompanied the serious patients and delivery to hospital on medical expenses of CDO Nepal.
- Children Development Program (CDP) for 160 brick worker's children where they provide nutrition food two times a day, regular health check-up, non-formal education, health training and full scholarship to selected students.

CDO Nepal also has 3 projects in education:
- Scholarship program for the selected children of CDP which they provide school and exam fees, stationeries and school dresses along with school bags for 50 children of brick factories workers.
- School Health and Nutrition Program (SHNP) for 80 Pre-school children of brick and carpet factory workers. CDO Nepal provides a glass of milk to each child, health awareness and Training, and monthly check-up with supply of medicines.
- School Health Education (SHE) for 795 Students of 4 different schools from class 6 to class 9.They provide health education and training focusing more on adolescent education, and health counseling.

CDO Nepal also has 3 projects with communities:
- Community Health Program in a village, an old age home, 5 carpet factories and 4 stone queries; for 850 people. They provide health check-up with medicines, health counseling, health awareness and health training.
- Mobile Health Project in 10 remote villages where they provide regular health check-up (General, Gynecologic, ENT (Ear Nose Throat), dental, eye), supply free medicines prescribe by doctor in camp, do health education and training, supply of micro nutrient mix and de-worming.
- Safe Motherhood and Child Care in 6 villages where they do awareness of ANC, PNC, safe motherhood, Nutrition & vaccines, provide vaccines for children and pregnant women in coordination with Nepal government, provide training of nutrition food, hand washing, breastfeeding, and accompanied the serious patients & delivery to hospital on medical expenses of CDO Nepal.

Finally CDO Nepal also offers a skills development program for single and needy women in local communities. The goal of the program is to provide women with business and technical skills, and to help them gain confidence needed to make a living. Training days are organized to teach women how to make complex beaded accessories including necklaces, bangles, pursues, earrings and knitted garments.

CDO Nepal employs 18 staffs and funds it activities with the support of individual donors and INGOs and companies like Maryknoll Nepal, MISSION Austria, La Madre Foundation, Omi Brotherhood High School, Japan.

Develop a database and train CDO field workers and the management team to use it.

CDO Nepal activities regroup a large number of projects in different locality including health check-up programs that require a very close follow-up of its beneficiaries, health education programs, health training programs, eyes check-up and schools health programs in remote villages, brick and carpet factories.
The field team of CDO Nepal is currently using paper-based records.
Activities in brick and carpet factories are daily and programs in remote villages are going on twice a month. Regarding the daily collection of data in brick and carpet factories, for instance, there are daily health check-up. The field workers based their records on the prescription of medicines that they provide to their beneficiaries. With the prescriptions they afterwards fill in a daily patient register. For the patient entry register, the data are name, sex, age, address, sickness, prescription given. From this register the field workers have afterwards to enter data in a register regarding the program.

At the end of each month, based on the daily information filled in the program register, they write a monthly report. The annually report are based on these monthly reports from the register.
For each program they are following this process. That is mean they are using lots of different registers for the different programs which make difficult to combine all the information for monthly and annually general reporting and compare the data months after months or years after years.
In some villages they also have different programs and activities filled in different registers. It therefore takes lots of time to collect all the data from the different registers and make a global reporting about one village regarding different programs that happened in one village.
For donors reporting or government data sharing, the director of the organisation has to leaf through the registers and enter the general data in an excel shit (statistic regarding number of patients regarding their age, sex, their health issues, their residency, etc), which can be made in an easier way if the organisation had a database.

Daily, the field workers are wasting lots of time to draw chart on the registers and to calculate the total amount of beneficiaries they have checked-up.

The electronic data will make CDO Nepal works much easy and will be useful to provide data to local authorities, develop futures programs and follow-up the programs and beneficiaries.

Therefore CDO Nepal needs a professional trainer to help them to develop a proper electronic Data Management System by helping to develop a database to record data in a systematic electronic way, and train CDO team to use it, the managing team to use the functionalities of the database to make statistics, graph, diagram, pivot table, etc; and the field workers to enter the data and get an idea of the functions of the database. This will allow CDO Nepal to make analysis and be able to give data to both national and international level.

Moreover, the future database will have to be accessible to all the team. The managing team is thinking to dedicate one computer for the data entry of the field workers in the office. This computer will be therefore accessible to all of the staff at any time. In view of data sharing and reduce the risk of losing data, the managing team is either thinking to safe the information in an external hard drive or to install the database in a drop box.
The office does not have an internal red for sharing information between the computers and laptops of the office. Due to load shedding, the computers will not work when there is no electricity.

This type of support is available locally but as CDO Nepal is a non profit making organization they cannot afford the support available locally.

The volunteers mission should enable the creation of a database in partnership with CDO Nepal managing team, who must also be trained on how to use it with the field workers.

The tasks of the volunteers can be divided as mentioned further:
- analysis of all type of data regarding activities and programs of CDO Nepal,
- database conception in partnership with the management team on Excel,
- training in use of it for data entry to the field workers, and utilization of the different tools of the database for analysis and reporting (graph, histogram, use pivot table, etc) with the managing team and the field workers.
- explore the possibility to installation of the database in a drop box/online for an access for each staff.
- If necessary, develop with the team, data collection tools to facilitate the data collection and entry.

Expected results at the end of the mission(s)

For the participants:
At the end of the mission, participants will be able to use all the functions of the database, update and extract all types of information and manage better reporting with quantitative data.

For the organization:
At the end of the mission, the training has enabled the structure to use an efficient database system, provide a better follow-up of it beneficiaries and provide data to the authorities.

Participants / Name: The mission is organized for 8 staff members of the organization.

Participants / Number: 8

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

There will be 8 staffs.
They all read and speak English.
The 5 field workers and members of the management team will participate to the training: director, the program officer and the administrative staff.

Participants / Training in the field request

The beneficiaries have never received any training in this field.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

Dipendra Maharjan, the finance officer of the organization will pick-up the volunteer in airport by car. It takes about 30 to 45 minutes to the accommodation place.

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will stay in the director and program officer home (they are married). The volunteer will have its own apartment shared with another volunteer if they are two, but will have its own bedroom.
CDO Nepal office is next door.

Means:

Whiteboard, 3 computers and 3 laptops with Microsoft office 2007 or 2010. Internet. Solar back-up. Video-projector.

Logistics:

The mission can happen anytime except during Dashain and Tihar festival (weeks 43 and 46).
The volunteer will work in Care and Development Organisations office.

The volunteer will be working 5/6 hours a day from Monday to Friday.

Meals will be taken at the home stay and /or at the office place.

No2033 | India | I.T. | Panchayati Rule And Gender Awareness Training Institute (PRAGATI)

Advanced level IT training for the team of PRAGATI

Pragatis team members wish to enhance their IT skills in order to produce better reporting and efficient presentation to share their work; as well as be able to train afterwards the women local government officers.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

      

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

PRAGATI was carved out of a renowned NGO Rural Litigation and Entitlement Kendra (RLEK) on 10th February 2000. It was founded by a group of passionate, dynamic women who operate the organization with belief in the Democratic Principle By the women, for the women and of the women to attain gender equity in local governance in the states of Uttarakhand, Himachal Pradesh, Jharkhand and Haryana.

The organization comprises only women working for the upliftment of women. The management board also consists of women. These women are drawn from diverse fields and have a wide range of experiences in the fields of rural development, management, community mobilization, gender, law, governance, monitoring and evaluation.

PRAGATI was created to achieve the Vision to build a gender just society and to accomplish the mission to enhance the status of women in social, economic and political spheres.
PRAGATI focuses on providing a support system to deliver good governance and capacitate women - the need of the hour of rural, poverty ridden, unreached, vulnerable people.
As a Resource Centre, building innovative strategies and practices to broaden the women political education, vision and skills through capacity building, advocacy & lobbying, trainings, exposure, networking with emphasis on exclusive training for women representatives is central to PRAGATI.

Since its creation, PRAGATI has run more that 25 projects, such as:
- Legal Awareness Camp to make women aware of their legal rights;
- Womens Empowerment Program through Self Help Groups;
- Augmenting Gender Equity in Local Governance through Transformative Womens Leadership and Citizenship;
- Mobilization and formation of 180 SHGs.
- Training of Trainers for Village Resource Management Committees.

PRAGATI is involved in pre-, during- and post-election training of elected women functionaries of local self governance; and is in the second half of 2014, in the process to run four legal awareness programs.

Lack of legal literacy is not just an impediment to individual dreams but to the effective functioning of the democracy. The issues of gender and poverty increase this problem manifold. In Indias context as the population nears the 1 billion mark and with issues of poverty and social inequities becoming larger, it is time to face the challenges.

PRAGATI believes that legal literacy is the key to the all round development of the country. There is an emergent need to generate legal literacy amongst the masses especially amongst the disadvantaged sections of the society. Women, due to their low levels of literacy, are susceptible to injustices.
With the aim to impart practical knowledge about the basic legal rights and remedies provided under various women-related laws, thereby making them fit to face the challenges in real life situations, the four legal awareness programs are ran by PRAGATI, with the support of National Commission for Women, in the districts of Haridwar (blocks Bahadrabad and Luxar) and Dehradun (blocks Raipur and Sahaspur) of Uttarakhand. In order to seek justice for all, safeguard rights and promote legal empowerment of the society there, emerges a need for making the local populace legally aware about their rights and entitlements.

PRAGATI also acts as resource agency in various projects of RLEK.

Via its activities PRAGATI supports approximately 6,500 women. These women are belonging to marginalized communities living below the poverty line, Self Help Groups women and elected women functionaries from entire state of Uttarakhand.

PRAGATIs activities are funded by different Ministries and Government departments such as Ministry of Minority Affairs, National Commission For Women etc. to name a few.

PRAGATI works in the rural parts of India and concentrates its activities in the states of Uttarakhand, Uttar Pradesh, Haryana and Himachal Pradesh.

PRAGATI employs 11 staff and gets support from 20 local volunteers.
PRAGATI also has more than 40 interns coming each month from various universities of India and abroad. Their work is equivalent to 10 full time employees.

To train the staff of PRAGATI to enhance their computer skills.

PRAGATIs team is facing issues with Word and Power Point to develop good reports and share their work with others.

The staff would like to be able to document their work in a more organized manner and enhance the quality of reports prepared.

Furthermore, an advanced computer training will enable PRAGATI to highlight its achievements and success and initiate dialogue for advocacy and lobbying for qualitative change.

In regard to Power point, the team needs an intensive training to develop good presentations that they have to do to put forth to relevant stakeholders the activities they undertake, the success achieved and the challenges faced. This will enable exchange of ideas and further enhance the work of PRAGATI. The team will be able to showcase their activities and achievements in a better manner through improved Power Point presentations.

PRAGATI team also needs to enhance their capacity in Excel in order to better document their Word reports using graphs, etc, and therefore also learn more on maintenance of their Excel tables.
The issues the team faces regarding the database use, maintenance and updating will be specifically covered by another mission to improve their database and learn how to use it in a proper way see PF nb 2032.

The government is also introducing computers in the Local Self Governance project, so perfecting these skills has become important for the PRAGATI team. They will further train their beneficiaries, the Panchayati Raj functionaries (local government officers), with these skills.

Training PRAGATI staff to enhance their capacity with practical sessions on:
- general maintenance of a computer and file management,
- Word to do better reporting and gain time,
- Excel to learn about the software functions (formula, graph) to include data in their Word report and maintenance of tables,
- Power Point to produce effective presentation.

This training can be organised in pair.

The trainer(s) should keep in mind that PRAGATI staff will afterwards try to transfer this knowledge amongst their beneficiaries i.e. Panchayati Raj functionaries, who have basic knowledge in computer, and also promote e-governance.
This will build the capacity of the local people who otherwise do not get any opportunity to enhance their skills.

Participants / Name: The training will be organized for the staffs of the organization.

Participants / Number: 15

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

The mission is organized for the 15 staff of PRAGATI which is all women. They are between 20 and 40 years old.

- Ms. Damini Bhargav, MA Economics, Master Trainer (Gender Issues) ;
- Ms. Pushpa Bisht, MA (Sociology), Trainer (Livelihood) ;
- Ms. Rekha Dhyani, M.A Hindi, Writer (I.E.C Unit);
- Ms. Pratima, MA Sociology, Trainer (Education) ;
- Ms. Ranjana Sharma, M.A English, Trainer (Education);
- Ms. Mamta, BA LL.B (Bachelor Degree of laws), LLM (Master Degree in Laws), Legal Trainer, Education and, Social justice;
- Ms. Shweta Gulati, MA Economics, Reporting and Documentation;
- Ms. Dolly Joshi, BA.LLB, LLM (Human Rights), Legal Trainer;
- Kala Bharti, MA Sociology, Field Facilitator ;
- Pyardai, MA Sociology, Field Facilitator ;
- Guddi, B.A (Hindi Literature), Field Facilitator;
- Ms. Tabasum, field staff;
- Ms. Vijay Laxmi, field staff;
- Ms. Kala Bharti, field staff;
- Ms. Sharmila, field staff.

Participants / Training in the field request

Almost all the participants hold Masters degrees in their respective fields.
They can read and speak in English. They have not received any training in the field of use of IT.

Airport: Dehradun

Transfer to the mission site:

PRAGATIs vehicle will receive the volunteer(s) from Dehradun airport and bring him/her/them to the office campus where he/she/they will be staying in PRAGATI fully furnished guestrooms.
It takes around 45 minutes from the Dehradun Jolly Grant Airport to accommodation site.

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer(s) have the possibility to stay in PRAGATIs guestrooms. He/she/they will be provided with a separate room with A.C. and attached bathroom within the RLEK Campus.
Each guestroom is modestly furnished with a double bed, a study table and a chair and T.V.

Means:

The mission will be carried out in PRAGATI/ RLEK office campus.
The office campus is fully equipped with all the facilities such as whiteboard, paperboard, computers with Wi-Fi connection, video projector etc.
The volunteer(s) will be allowed to use all the above mentioned material, if he/she/they need any other assistance within PRAGATIs capacity, it will be provided to the volunteer upon request.
PRAGATI will hire 2 computers from outside and arrange rest of 13 computers from RLEK and State Resource Center for Adult Education, Uttarakhand.
Windows 7, Windows XP Service pack 2 and 3 MS version are installed in the computers.

Logistics:

The volunteer(s) may start his/her/their training from 11:00 until 17:00 with one hour lunch break in between; from Monday to Friday.
The mission site and stay of accommodation is within PRAGATI office Campus, so the volunteer(s) will not have to worry about his/her/their travel each day.
All the meals (breakfast, lunch, dinner and evening tea) will be provided in the mess (called the cooperative kitchen) within the office campus along with staff members.
The mission can happen anytime of the year except during the festival of lights Diwali, in October.

Comment:

The volunteer(s) should have a good knowledge in IT and have experience as a trainer.