No1723 | Nepal | Arts | Nepal Break Dance Foundation

Training of trainers of NBF’s volunteer staff in Hip Hop as a mean to mobilize the youth away from drugs and violence and gain self-confidence

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

     

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Nepal Break Dance Foundation is a Nepali non profit enterprise created in 2008 by Krisada Kanchanawat, the actual director, in order to distract youth away from drug abuse and violence, through involvement in various aspects of entertainment sector such as Hip Hop and youth focused film production.

The volatile security situation in the Terai region (south of Nepal), the unstable political situation (with the dissolution of the constituent assembly, and the lack of a constitution), contribute to the rise in opium cultivation. The growing Indian market via the open border with Nepal has increased demand for opium. The Government report states that on a population of 30 millions of habitants, approximately 80,000 Nepalese are addicted to drugs.
In order to fight against that, NBF has held a strong policy of all its events promoting Say No to Drugs and Violence and other social issues.

The main objectives of the project were to prevent youth from drug abuse and violence through skill training and employment generation, to involve youth in social issues through means that are interesting to them. And establish NBF as a production house covering both entertainment program and technical production units.

Nepal Break dance Foundation is in the process of institutionalising the annual Himalayan International B Boying/B Girling Jatra (in Nepali Jatra means festival; and “B Boy/B Girl” is the short term for break dancing) promoting a specific social issue such as – Say No to Drugs and Violence. NBF has managed to organise the Jatra for two years consecutively 2010 and 2011. In 2010 three Thai B Boys were invited for the Jatra, and in 2011, the Jatra hosted 3 French B Girls.

NBF raised funds with support of Rotary Club of Mount Everest since two years.
The aim from the beginning was to make the studio, where they are working, financially independent by making it a socio-enterprise by charging training fee for those who could afford it and by offering scholarships for the marginalised or especially committed and talented.

Today NBF has taken the next step – towards establishing a film production unit which will produce youth focused entertainment programs. Youth are being trained in technical skills such as cameraman, light man and script writer. The entertainment part has already gone ahead with the B Boy/B Girl performances, which also addresses social issues such as gender based violence.

Different activities could be learned and done by B boy/girl as providing skills training in entertainment sector (Hip Hop elements: B Boy/B Girl dancing; beat boxing; rapping, graffiti and hip hop theatre (choreography, music)). Providing skills training in technical production such as: camera operation, script writing, lighting, logistics and editing.

NBF plans upcoming activities:
Training by professionals: film production with focus on youth entertainment; elements out of Hip Hop: break dancing and theatre.

From now around 200 people benefited from the actions: the B Boy / B Girl, the crew members, the youth who can have trainings in hip hop and others activities. This is a small framework with 4 employees, who are B boys instructors. And with 4 persons who work on full voluntary basis and are responsible for running the organisation: director, marketing, linkage and networking, choreographer & B Girl instructor.
In Nepal caste and ethnicity are a big issue. In NBF youth and children come from all caste and ethnic groups. What becomes the most important is that they are able to practice and improve their skills in dancing. Their crews are not based on caste but on their skills and commitment to learning the skills of B Boying/B Girling. As gender is also an issue in Nepal and girls are not “supposed” to do B Girling, NBF declared 2012 a year of scholarship for all girls wanting to learn B Girling. This has increased the number of girls attending from 10 to 50. The youth and children are coming from all over Nepal. Some of them came to study in Kathmandu; some are looking for a job.
The age group range of youth and children in NBF is from 8 to 25 years. The age range 15 to 25 has been marked as high risk group vulnerable to drug abuse, HIV&AIDS and violence. This is the reason why NBF does not make its target group exclusive to only economically marginalize.

To teach both the skills and the principles of Hip Hop to the youth involved in NBF.

Today’s youth and children of Nepal were either born or grew up as adolescents during the ten-year violent conflict that affected the country from 1996 to 2006.
Following this conflict, the lack of opportunities or daring to dream are factors that contribute to frustration, leading to attraction to drug abuse and violence among the youth and children. The 10 year civil war has taught the youngsters that violence is the way to get what you want, even if it means hurting someone else to fulfil ones’ wishes.

Hip Hop attracts youngsters with its 4 elements (DJ, MC, Breakdancing and graffiti culminating in HipHop Theatre) and at the same time gives the message that the 4 Principles of Love, Peace, Unity and Fun are the right attitude. Therefore NBF wants to give the youth international professional Hip Hop figures who believe in the 4 Principles as role models.

Hence this mission could be beneficial if Planete Urgence could help in bringing in the volunteers.

The 4 Principles of Hip Hop (LOVE, PEACE, UNITY AND FUN) and the 4 Elements of Hip Hop (DJ, MC, Breakdancing and graffiti culminating in HipHop Theatre) are a powerful combination for attracting youth to a constructive and fun way to express their feelings about their own situation, their community and society. It is also popular amongst Nepali youth. However, misconstrued ideas and lack of knowledge about the principles of Hip Hop need to be removed.

Nepal’s Hip Hop culture is still coming of age and NBF needs Hip Hop artists who are committed and promote these 4 principles through the 4 elements, while Break Dancers with strong background and knowledge in Hip Hop culture is not available in Nepal.

NBF is therefore looking for Hip Hop artists with in particular skills in break dancing, good knowledge and commitment to the 4 Principles and ability to teach young people both the skills and the principles of Hip Hop.
NBF itself cannot afford to access expert profiles as sent by Planète Urgence, and such volunteers will help NBF provide professional services to the youth, which will encourage them to take their message seriously.

The intervention of the volunteer should enable youth members of NBF to have a clear idea about the 4 Principles and 4 elements of Hip Hop. They will particularly learn skills or enhance existing skills in break dancing that will make them more professional.

Expected results
- For participants
The consequences and changes that NBF expects from the mission is to have a clear knowledge of the 4 Principles and elements of Hip- hop, understand the concept and how to serve and raise awareness in the community using this knowledge.
The changes after the mission would be to build up capacities in their personal life as well as for the organization, build up confidence and use the knowledge in a better and a useful way.
- For the organisation
Having a clear concept of the above mentioned i.e. when the participants have a good knowledge of say Breaking or MCeeing it would be better for the organizations because participants participating in this mission will be able to teach and spread the 4 Principles and 4 elements of Hip-hop to other students in the organization and outside.

Participants / Name:

Participants / Number: 20

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

NBF has two target groups:
1. B Boys/B Girls who are NBF members and have been doing break dancing and also teaching in some cases.
2. Students who are learning break dancing at different levels.

Around 20 persons will take part in this mission out of which around 8 are Girls. Their age range is from 13 years to 25 years.

They have a fairly good knowledge of written and spoken English.

Participants / Training in the field request

They are college and school students and youth who are working. They have never been trained in Hip Hop, they learnt on their own.

Participants / Motivation

Participants hope to gain improved break dancing skills, strengthened with strong and clear knowledge about Hip Hop culture and its principles, to make them professionals. This will help them gain respect from mainstream society.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

The volunteer will be welcome at the airport by a member of Nepal Break Dance Foundation who will bring him/her to the hotel in Kathmandu by taxi (around 20 minutes).

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will sleep in a guest house Hana Hotel, which is one minute walk from NBF office, located in Thamel area (the touristic and very dynamic area of Kathmandu).

He/she will have a private room and bathroom.

The volunteer will take the breakfast at the hotel, and the other meals can be taken in NBF office (Dal bhat, Noodles, momos). There is a kitchenette on the balcony. The volunteer can also have lunch in restaurant; there is wide choice of eateries in Thamel.

Means:

A sound system is available, and the volunteer will have access to the dance room of NBF, equipped with mirrors. Microphones and other material depending on the element the mission will focus on can be provided (turntables, paint...). The only thing that cannot be found in Nepal are the special tips for paint sprays necessary for graffiti).

Other equipment available in the office room are a desk and one laptop; and a flip board with stand (where newsprints can be clipped on or used as a board for writing with board markers).

There is electricity when there is no load shedding, but a generator will be rented for the training if necessary.

An internet connection will be made available.

Logistics:

The volunteer will work during the mission from the accommodation site to the training site, which is very near.

The mission will take place all the day - 5 days a week for 2 weeks with an average of about 6h of activities per day (interaction with the youth, exchanges/preparation, with NBF staff management).

Comment:

Profile of the volunteer: an experienced Hip Hop artist, with advanced skills in the element of Break Dancing, but also knowledgeable of the other elements and committed to the 4 Principles of Hip Hop (LOVE, PEACE, UNITY AND FUN).

No1923 | Nepal | Arts | Down Syndrome Society Nepal (DSSN)

Art therapy training for the teachers of DSSN’s day care centre in Kathmandu.

To train in art therapy the teachers of the Satyam day care centre in Kathmandu and the teachers of their day care centre partners coming from different places in Nepal.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

     

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Down Syndrome Society Nepal is an NGO created in 2010 by Shila Thapa and 8 other parents of intellectual disabled children. DSSN protects and promotes the basic human rights of the intellectually disabled children.

Despite how relatively common Down syndrome is, in Nepal it is not understood as a chromosomal disorder. Nepalese doctors and nurses are often not well informed and lack basic understanding of the symptoms; leading to tragic misdiagnosis. Often children are not properly diagnosed and never treated as they should be. As Down syndrome is associated with many serious physical problems (heart defects, poor eyesight, etc.) that demand urgent care, the lives of many Down’s children are simply lost without access to relevant medical practitioners and counsellors.

Shila Thapa, the founder of the organization, lost her brother to meningitis at age six as her mother was not educated enough to react in the right way. That was a powerful lesson to Shila: mothers need education and access to care for their children.
In 2002, Shila gave birth to her second child. After a lengthy struggle and multiple consultations with doctors, her son was diagnosed with Down Syndrome and a heart condition.

Following this and due to lack of treatment in Nepal, Shila had to go to India in order for her son to undergo operations for his survival. This allowed her to learn more about the condition and Down syndrome’s support groups in India.

Back in Nepal, Shila had to train herself in physiotherapy to be able to answer to her child’s need and this led her to open a clinic to support other children with Down Syndrome.

In 2005, she founded the Down Syndrome Support Centre—the first in Nepal, now called Satyam Day Care Centre (SDDC).
Thanks to her mother-in-law’s support, Shila was able to cater to her sons need and to other needy children with Down Syndrome, whose parents cannot afford treatment. And so, in 2010 she started Down Syndrome Society Nepal with the help of other parents, especially of mothers.

Since 2005, in a country where a word for Down syndrome does not exist, Shila has reached out to parents, the medical community, the government and a network of citizen organizations (COs) working with disability, to make children with Down Syndrome and their parents a vibrant, empowered community with the resources and education to improve the lives of their children and influence Nepalese society.

Shila has employed a two-pronged institutional strategy by operating a support centre and day care centre, as well as partnering with other disability groups and lobbying the government of Nepal.

The support centre is responsible for sensitization programs on Down syndrome amongst parents, medical practitioners, medical institutions, educational institutes, and the government. Shila informs professionals and the general public that Down syndrome is not a disease but a genetic condition.

In Nepal, children with Down syndrome are viewed as retarded, dangerous, and even “mad” and their mothers are often discriminated against and ostracized. Through programs organized by the centre, Shila is creating spaces where children with Down syndrome and “normal” children interact and learn from each other. She encourages families and society to celebrate these children and their talents. She does not force activities, but develops their natural talents.

The centre organizes public programs as a mean to raise funds while increasing awareness and also includes celebrities and lawmakers in her awareness programs. In-kind support is provided by volunteers who offer many therapies to the children while large organizations contribute with equipment, books, donation boxes and business-plan consulting to Shila.

The support centre also runs a vocational training program for children over twelve-years-old to enable them to become economically productive members of society.
Named Prothshaan, this program focuses overall on enhancing the lives of people with Down syndrome and people with intellectual disability, providing quality instruction and meaningful work.

The centre provides Physiotherapy, an Early Stimulation Program, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy and routine vaccinations to the children. The centre also provides classes, music and dance therapy, exercise, and other services to Down’s children.

Currently, Satyam day care centre supports 15 children or young adults with Down Syndrome or intellectual disabilities and touches around 250 families via 15 partner day care centres.

The current Satyam Day Care Centre services are:
- Special education: education of the children in adapted way for each one.
- Medical general check-up and support for special medical needs.
- Speech therapy done by Shila as she has attended a workshop in Singapore.
- Dance therapy done by a Nepali volunteer twice a week.
- Music therapy done by a Nepali volunteer once a week.
- Occupational therapy: day to day activities which means life skill, daily routine activities.
- Physiotherapy done by Shila who follow a course for a year.
- Self Help Skills: division among the children of daily work as cleaning, cooking, washing clothes.
- Early intervention: detection of Down syndrome and activity with young children (sensation of cold/hot, texture, noises…).
- Physical Training and Sports.
- Educational tours: recreational activities out of the centre one Friday a month to claim the “Right to go out” (cinema, park…).

12 persons are working in the centre: the director (Shila Thapa), the principal of the centre, 4 teachers, 1 supervisor, 1 administration officer, 1 driver, 1 cooker, 1 kitchen assistant and 1 office boy.

3 teachers have received a teacher training from the Japanese Cooperation but not specifically in special education.

A new teacher has been hired from end of March 2014. She has received training in early childhood stimulation and on how to develop activities for children with various disabilities.

The principal of the school also acts in the education program and has received a Montessori training.

The 15 children coming daily to the center are from 4 to 25 years old :3 have 24 and 25 years old, 3 have between 14 to 16 years old. The rest of them are from 4 to 12 years old.

To train in art therapy “special” teachers working with children and young adults with Down Syndrome or intellectual disability.

DSSN has a team of 4 teachers in their day care centre in Kathmandu and has 15 day care centre partners all over Nepal that DSSN helps to start.
The members and founders of the organization and some of the teachers are the parents of the beneficiaries of the centres. They are doing their best to give maximum support to their children and help them to develop as much as possible their capacity.

They believe that art therapy can play an important role to develop and enhance the cognitive capacities of children with intellectual disability.

At the moment two Nepali volunteers, acting as extras to the teachers, carry music and dance activities with the children and youths but they don’t have any idea to manage it in a therapeutic way. The teachers and/or parents involved in the center do not know either about art therapy.

That is why a training in art therapy, in a very simple and practical way, will help them to understand the concept of art therapy, what can and will be the benefit for the children and youths of the centres, how to carry different activities in a therapeutic way and how to adapt the current activities as well.

Really often people in Nepal think that art therapy is to carry recreational activities but do not know to conduct these activities in a therapeutic way.

For all these reasons, DSSN is requesting a training in art therapy from Planète Urgence’s volunteer(s).

DSSN also does not have the required funds to attend this kind of training.

This training in art therapy will be organised for the 4 “special” teachers of Satyam centre in Kathmandu, the principal and the director of DSSN. Some of them are parents of the children.

Prior to the Planète Urgence volunteer(s)’ intervention, DSSN will also consider the possibility for some of its board members and staffs from partner day-care centres to join the training. This possibility will be discussed along with the volunteer(s) to determine the most efficient schedule and number of participants accordingly.

The majority of the participants will be women.

For possible participants from the partner day-care centres located outside of Kathmandu valley (10 out of 15), Satyam Day Care Center will arrange for the accommodation and the meals in the centre.

DSSN suggests that the intervention of the volunteer is divided daily into two different sessions:
- One theoretical session including general presentation of art therapy, concepts of art therapy, artistic approaches in therapy to develop creative potential, methodology to manage activities, interpretation.
- One practical session with the children of Satyam day care centre through the organization of different activities like theater, tales, clown, fine arts, voice activities, dance, masks, etc.

Several missions may be required for the staff to acquire all the necessary skills.

After the mission(s) DSSN is expecting the following results:

For the participants :
All the participants wish to take part to the training to learn about the concept of art therapy and learn to manage artistic activities in a therapeutic way, which will help the children and youths to develop their capacity.
After the training(s), the teachers and board members of the day care centres will know about the concept of art therapy and will have a clearest idea about the benefits of art therapy for children with disabilities.
They will feel more comfortable and will be able to manage art activities with the children and youths in a therapeutic way.
The participants might use these new skills at home with their children as well, and share them with other parents or teachers of partner day-care centres.

In the long term DSSN hopes to see evolutions in the behaviour of the children and youths.

For the organization
DSSN hopes to improve the support they give to the children and youths.
As DSSN is working as well on the concept of inclusive education, it hopes that after the training its teachers will also be able to train other teachers from ”normal” school around the centre on art therapy, which might be really useful for the children of these schools, who have personal issues as well. DSSN is thinking to organize inclusive activities in art therapy with neighbouring schools.

Participants / Name: 4 teachers + principal + director of DSSN.

Participants / Number: 6

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

Minimum 6 : 4 teachers + principal + director of DSSN.

To be determined with the volunteer: 1 or 2 staffs of partner day-care centres (around 10/15 centres) +. some board members.

Just few of them speak and understand English, an interpreter will help, either among the staff, or hired externally.

Participants / Training in the field request

None of the participants have received a training in art therapy.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

Shila Thapa will pick up the volunteer at the airport in a private car. It will take approximately 30-40 minutes to accommodation, depending on traffic.

Accommodation & food:

The Planète Urgence volunteer(s) will stay at a guesthouse in an individual room with private bathroom, electricity and free wifi. The guesthouse will be located in the touristic area of Kathmandu, Thamel.

Means:

The Planète Urgence volunteer(s) will work at the DSSN day-care centre in Baluwatar, Kathmandu.

DSSN has an office with 1 desk and 1 computer with the Internet.

DSSN does not have an electricity back-up. Electricity short-cuts vary depending on the time of the year.
There is a paper board.

Music instruments are also available: drum set, guitar, keyboard, Mouth Organ, Nepali instrument Harmonium, Madal and Sarangi.

As well as games: Badminton, Basket ball, Shot-put, Carom board and puzzles.
There are only limited art materials.

All this material can be used by the volunteer(s) during the mission.

Logistics:

The mission can happen anytime expect during national holidays: Dashain and Tihar (weeks 40 and 43).

All daily transportation can be done by walking (15 to 20 minutes) or by taxi.

The volunteer will work from 10am to 5pm from Monday to Friday. He/she can work on Sunday as well, which is a working day in Nepal.

The volunteer can have lunch in the centre. Breakfasts and dinners will be taken outside in restaurants.

Comment:

DSSN is looking for volunteer(s) with a degree in art therapy and with experience in managing group/individual art activities.

No1946 | Nepal | Arts | Voice of Children (VOC)

Training on the topic of ‘ART THERAPY FOR KIDS’ for Voice Of Children’s staff members

This training in art therapy will allow to build the capacity of VOC’s psychologist, social workers and children activities facilitators in order to ensure a quality psychosocial support to the most deprived and vulnerable children targeted in the different programmes of VOC.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

     

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Voice Of Children has been created in 2000 by Krishna Kumar Thapa, the current Director, to support street children.

Krishna Thapa was working in one organisation providing care and study facilities to street children. When he left the organisation, the children requested him to still take care of them. After consultation with his friends, and thanks to their support, the NGO was created. Krishna has an educational diploma in sociology and has experience as a Child Rights activist. He has been involved in the Child Rights sector for 18 years.

According to the National Alliance of Organisations for Street Children, the number of street children in Kathmandu is estimated at 1,500. This figure is certainly under-estimated as additional children arrive in the streets every day. These children live off collecting garbage and begging. Half of them use drugs and 85% have been subjected to sexual violence.

Overall, the population of Nepal is young (65% is less than 30 years old) and under-qualified: 44% of the population and 56% of women are illiterate. Due to the lack of education and vocational training, these youngsters are the most vulnerable on the job market. This is even more so for young adults from disadvantaged families. Without a job, or holding low-skilled jobs, these youngsters struggle to escape the vicious circle of poverty.

VOC was created to tackle the street children phenomenon and to support them through rescue, rehabilitation and reintegration. VOC’s target is Children at risk, Street Children, Sexually Abused Children.

The organisation works all over Nepal according to the permanent residence of children's families.
In Kathmandu, VOC intervenes in four different zones: Kankeshwori, a slum in UN park, Jadibuti and Patan.

VOC hires in total 60 employees, from office to field staff (3/4 of the staff is active in the field).

To achieve its objective, VOC has two different programmes, a Street Children Programme and a Programme against Child Sexual Abuse, and implements several projects, all interrelated:

- Children at risk, for which VOC is supporting poor families’ capacities to solve problems on their own in order to progress towards increased autonomy, stability and reduced poverty, and strengthening the child protection mechanism in the community, covering about 1,000 families, equiv. to 4,400 persons...
- Rescue, for street and sexually abused children. This project generates the awareness to the children living/working in the streets about the risks of street life and motivates them to leave the street life. VOC operate through street work and Drop-in Centers and caters to 1,100 children through these outreach activities.
- Rehabilitation, focuses on preparation of 120 children for their sustainable future and prepare for family and community reintegration. The children stay for short term in a preparation centre where they upgrade their education level and improve their life skills, make future plan and are prepared for sustainable reintegration with family and community.
- Reintegration, with family, community or foster family. VOC follows up the families and help them to build their capacity to care for their children (150 were reintegrated in 200 families, this programme supporting overall 880 persons). For children without a family, VOC provides nutrition, accommodation, education and job placement.
- Economic development. VOC supports 150 children/youths and their family for economic development by providing vocational training and referring for job placement or by linking with the organisations working for savings, micro-credit and entrepreneurship development.
- VOC also provides Psychosocial Support to 1,100 children at risk, street children, children victims of sexual abuses and their families

In addition, VOC’s work and visibility help build overall the awareness of 600,000 persons on sexual abuse (students/teachers/Social Workers/Doctors/Hoteliers, Police).

VOC receives technical support from Enfants et Développement, a French organisation, for social projects: methodology, counselling skills, etc and for institutional aspects, as management, good governance, fund raising, etc.
VOC has several donors to run its activities: Enfants et Développement and Partage from France, ECPAT from Luxembourg, Child Rights from Netherland, World Childhood Foundation and the European Union.

To train the psychologist, social workers and children activities facilitators of Voice of Children on ‘ART THERAPY FOR KIDS’.

VOC wishes to build the capacity of its staff members in order to ensure a quality psychosocial support to the most deprived, vulnerable children targeted in its different programmes based on the social status of their families and the cases of abuse and of children living in the streets reported to VOC or observed through outreach in the communities.

Activities in Art therapy have been experienced in a project of Enfants et Développement in Cambodia with positive results.
While taking part to an inter-country seminar in Burkina Faso, VOC’s team showed interest for this activity, but ED does not have the mean to provide specific trainings to VOC in Nepal, because of the lack of professionals in this area in the country.
VOC is really interested to offer an efficient and adapted psychosocial support to the children (at the moment VOC only provides individual counselling and psychosocial family therapy).

The children that would benefit from the Art therapy activities are children for whom the children activities facilitators detect uneasiness, which will be confirmed by the social workers and for which all the team will work on with the child and his/her family.
These children are at risk, some not going to school, some attending school irregularly or underperforming at school, living half in their home and half in the streets, children living in unsafe environments (with alcoholic, violent or careless parents), and children victim of different kinds of abuses.

The participants to the training wish to develop their capacity to work with those children in an effective way.

Afterwards they will be able to identify children in suffering more easily, the children will be referred for home/family support to other social workers, and will be followed-up through Art Therapy activities. The improvements will be readable with an Art therapy indicator tool that will be implemented during the mission through the transmission of knowledge on how to assess the changes and improvements of the children (see below).

VOC expects from the trainer:

- A specific training in Art therapy to the VOC’s psychologist. According to the evaluation done by the trainer about the Psychologist level, he/she will give theoretical skills to the Psychologist to improve her art therapy practice and make her able to support after the training the social workers and the children activities facilitators.

- A practical art therapy training to the social workers and the children activities facilitators. They must be able to conduct Art therapy activities with deprived children or children at risk under the psychologist monitoring:
-> Drawing and painting;
-> Expression of emotion from the drawing;
-> Communication;
-> Analysis of Arts;
-> Colour Psychology.

They will also be able to train other children activities facilitators afterwards.

At the end of the mission, VOC expects that:
- The social worker and the children activities facilitators will be able to analyze children behaviour and suffering through Art therapy activities,
- The social worker and the children activities facilitators will be able to help and support the children in suffering through Art therapy activities,
- The social worker and the children activities facilitators will be able to assess the changes and improvements of the children.

VOC expects that the social workers and the children activities facilitators will provide an effective work with the children for their development and protection, and that their creativity will develop. They will be able to organize activities related with art and colours with the children.

Participants / Name: Social workers, psychologist and children activities facilitators

Participants / Number: 16

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

The mission will be organised for the 12 social workers, the psychologist and the 3 children activities facilitators of VOC who directly work with the beneficiaries (street children, children at risk, and children victims of abused, vulnerable families).

The 12 social workers provide psycho-social follow-up at home, conduct social centres activities (mainly individual counselling), work in network with the available service providers and refer the families, hold group discussions and awareness sessions.
The 3 children activities facilitators manage the activities with children as recreational activities, parents/children activities for children under 5, remedial classes, group discussion, individual counselling, and child club activities.

Participants / Training in the field request

Only the psychologist has received previously training in art therapy but it was only an introduction to the basics of art therapy activities and she does not have the knowledge on how to implement overall an art therapy programme and to assess the results, as requested for this mission.

The participants of the training speak English, few only have basic English. A VOC staff will translate during the training.
The participants have between 20 and 40 years old and are 50% men and 50% women.
They all have College degrees from Intermediate to Master Degrees

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

A staff will welcome the volunteer at the airport. It will take between 30 to 45 minutes to reach the place where the volunteer will stay according to traffic.

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will stay in a guesthouse or VOC’s or Planète Urgence’s office according to his/her preferences. All are equipped with individual rooms and bathrooms and the Internet.

Means:

The volunteer will work in VOC’s office in Sanepa, Lalitpur.
VOC office has a board, computers equipped with Office 2007 and an internet connection, a video-projector.

Logistics:

The volunteer will work from Monday to Friday from 9:30 am to 5 pm with flexibility.
Depending on the accommodation place, the volunteer can come to office by walk or by taxi.
The volunteer will have lunch at VOC’s office, breakfasts at VOC’s office or in the guesthouse and dinner in restaurants.

Comment:

Art Therapy trainers are difficult to find in Nepal and the curriculums in psychology are new in Nepal. Therefore, VOC requests from Planete Urgence the support by a professional in art therapy, expert in the relevant domain.

No2068 | Nepal | Arts | Antardristi Nepal

Training in ‘ART THERAPY for kids and youths’ for Antardristi’s staff members

This training in art therapy will allow building the capacity of Antardristi’s staff directly in contact with children and young women victim of sexual abuse within their family or community, in order to ensure a quality psychosocial support.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

     

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Antardristi was established by a group of Nepali women in 2003. They started the NGO after their visit to a police station that highlighted that the cases of sexual abuse and their victims were given very little consideration. Indeed, anytime a case of sexual abuse is registered, nobody would seem to be able to address the child or woman’s mental state. Therefore, the founders of Antardristi decided to work on sexual abuse issues by providing psychological care to children and young women, among other things.

Antardristi’s mission is to prevent sexual abuse of children and young women and promote improved mental health among minors. It facilitates community outreach activities for teachers, students and communities of Nepal. Antardristi seeks to raise awareness in schools and dispel traditional perceptions such as blaming the victim. It aims to foster social change in the area of mental health, in which the individual is often stigmatized. The organization also empowers and supports child survivors of sexual abuse through psychosocial counseling.
Antardristi also understands the need for reaching out to adult survivors of sexual abuse (SA) in order to support them in an adequate manner and prevent any further re-victimization as well as enable them to heal from the impact of sexual abuse.

The goals of Antardristi are:
- to raise awareness of, empower against and hence prevent sexual abuse,
- to provide psychological and rehabilitative intervention for families and survivors impacted by sexual abuse,
- to provide outreach and support community integration, following the process of rehabilitation.

The current activities of Antardristi are:
- Awareness programs in schools, communities in Kaski, Syangja, Myagdi, Makwanpur Chitwan and Jhapa,
- 1 day teacher training in Kaski, Syangja, Myagdi, Makwampur, Chitwan and Jhapa,
- General campaigns and street drama to raise awareness on the issue of SA in Kaski, Syangja, Myagdi, Makwampur, Chitwan and Jhapa,
- Psychosocial and rehabilitative interventions for families and children and young women impacted by sexual abuse. Antardristi has 2 centers and one transit home. The transit home in Kathmandu has been opened in 2007, one center in Pokhara opened in 2008 and one in Hetauda opened in 2010. 3 children/young women can be accommodated in Kathmandu, 15 children/young women in Pokhara and 20 children/young women in Hetauda.

By November 2014, Antardristi has rescued 15 children from different part of Nepal and has reintegrated 6 children into their home. Those children whose family reintegration is not possible were sent to Antardristi network organizations.
Antardristi is getting funds from Danida (Denmark's development cooperation) for its awareness program for 2 years. For the survivors, Antardristi is getting funds from individual donors both national and international.

Antardristi is operating its programs in 20 districts of the 75 of Nepal and received cases from 20 different districts from far Western region of Nepal to Eastern regions.

Antardristi employs 14 staff and 2 part times.

To train the counselor, outreach coordinators, residential in charge from the safe home, program manager and reintegration officer of Antardristi on Art Therapy for kids and young women.

Antardristi is working in a really taboo sector, especially in Nepal, which does not help to treat the cases; the staff is really interested to offer an efficient and adapted psychosocial support to these children and young women, whose trauma is really deep.

As Antardristi is working with sexually abuse children and young women, this training will help its staff to make beneficiaries describe and express their feelings and traumas more easily and therefore decrease their anxiety.

Antardristi has experimented, while working with children and young women, that only doing counseling sometimes is not enough to disclose the traumas. The team believes that it will be easier if they offer the possibility for their beneficiaries to express their feelings in a different way, without speaking.

It will help them to work more efficiently by using a different kind of therapy.

The participants to the training will be the staff directly in contact with the identified cases; as the counselor, the reintegration officer, the program manager and the residential in charge of the safe home.
The outreach workers are the people who are giving awareness classes in different areas of Nepal. While giving these awareness classes, they also find out cases so their participation in the training is as well really important and will allow them to provide initial counseling there also.
The residential in charge of the safe home will be able to establish a follow-up thought Art therapy and the improvements will be readable with an Art therapy indicator tool.

At the end of the mission Antardristi expects that:
- The staff will feel more confident in their work and they hope to be able to identify quicker the root cause of the traumas and therefore support the cases as soon as they are identified, to reduce their pain, anxiety and their unsafe feelings,
- The staff will be able to develop and organize activities related with art,
- The staff will be able to analyze children behaviour and suffering through Art therapy activities,
- The staff will be able to assess the changes and improvements of the children.

The trainer will train the staff of Antardristi on:
- Theoretical skills about Art therapy, how to develop Art therapy practices, how to assess changes and establish a follow-up,
- Practical Art therapy sessions to allow Antardristi staff to conduct Art therapy activities:
-> Drawing and painting,
-> Expression of emotion from the drawing;
-> Communication;
-> Analysis of Arts;
-> Color Psychology, etc.

Participants / Name: The mission will be organized for 7 staff of Antardristi.

Participants / Number: 7

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

They are 6 women and 1 man, between 28 to 42 years old: 1 counselor, 2 outreach coordinators, 2 residential in charge from the centers, 1 program manager and 1 reintegration officer.

They all speak English.

Participants / Training in the field request

- Yogita Chapagain, Master in Sociology (program manager)
- Ramchandra Lamichhane, Master in Public Health, running (outreach coordinator)
- Samikshya Bhujel, Master in Account running (residential in charge)
- Megha Magar, Diploma in Account (Reintegration Officer)
- Rajani Bharati, Master in Psychology running (counselor )
- Rina Shrestha, Diploma in Sociology (outreach coordinator)
- Kalpana Sharma, School level Certificate (residential in charge)

Antardrist staff has already received an expressive Art therapy training for 5 days, where they learnt meditation, observing game, energy exercises, facilitation skills, inside outside drawing, connection drawing, listening exercise and tree of life.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

A staff will welcome the volunteer at the airport. It will take between 30 to 45 minutes to reach Antardristi head office in Patan and/or reach the accommodation on the first day according to flight schedule.
The second day the volunteer will go by jeep with the team to Hetauda, which is at a 4 hours drive from Kathmandu (district of Makwanpur).

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will be accommodated with the team in a rented home in Hetauda. The volunteer will have to share a room with one woman staff. There will be no attached bathroom. There will be electricity, but not 24 hours as Nepal experiences power cuts every day for 2 hours on average. The volunteer can use an Internet connection in the safe house.

Means:

The volunteer will work in one of the Antardristi safe home where abused children are accommodated, in Hetauda, out of Kathmandu valley. Mostly there will be 18 to 20 children. Most of the children will be in school from 10 am to 4 pm.
This place has a white board, computers with windows XP, an Internet connection and video-projector.

Logistics:

The volunteer will work from Sunday to Friday from 10 am to 4 pm with flexibility. The volunteer can work on Saturdays as well.

The mission can happen anytime of the year except during the festival of Tihar and Dashain, in weeks 43 and 46 in 2015.

From the accommodation place, the volunteer will come to the safe home with the staff by walking; it will take 5 minutes.

The volunteer will have the meals at the safe home with the team. At 9 o'clock the volunteer can have Nepali lunch, which is rice, vegetable, pickle and lentil soup, at 2 o'clock the volunteer will have snacks and at 7.30pm the volunteer will have dinner. If the volunteer wants to have lunch outside of the safe house, he/she can but will have to inform the staff in advance.

Comment:

Antardristi would like a professional in Art therapy, expert in the relevant domain.

No1994 | Nepal | Design | Manushi

Support to Manushi organization to develop new design of clothes, accessories and bags.

In order to extend its support to a wider range of beneficiaries and make its activities sustainable, Manushi would like foreign designers to help them develop their range of products.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

     

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Manushi was created in 1991 by a group of seven professional women from different sectors (University teacher, high Level government officers and social workers) to support the empowerment of disadvantaged women especially from rural areas.

Ms. Padmasana Shakya, the founder of Manushi and chairperson of the organisation, has a Master in Economics and is devoted social work and women issues.

Manushi is addressing gender issues and its goal is to promote gender equality in the promotion of sustainable development, enhance social and economic status of women and put women in the forefront of human development.

Manushi is supporting women economically by providing them skill-based and capacity building trainings to empower them through social and economic upliftment.

Manushi’s main projects are:
-Women empowerment and self confidence.
-Micro enterprise development through a micro credit programme
-Social and economical upliftment of women through handicraft development
-Network development for marketing

At the beginning, Manushi started a micro enterprise project for 4 years (1993-1997), with the support of the International Council on Management of Population(ICOMP), a Malaysia-based organization.
Manushi established a handicraft development programme focusing on low income, destitute, marginalized producers, especially women. This programme became regular and is now supporting 1,800 beneficiaries from 8 districts (90% are women).

Manushi also currently provides skill upgrade trainings to the producers through on-the-job training, as well as advanced skill upgrade trainings with the help of partner organizations.

Most of the time the design of products is decided by the buyers but Manushi’s staff and their producers also develop new products or designs to expend the market.

1. Production – Manushi focuses on eco-friendly handicrafts based on natural fiber products like banana fiber or hemp, and using natural dyes like herbs and fruits. Manushi has 1,200 regular producers.
2. Micro credit to women- Manushi has launched a microcredit programme since 10 years for poor women in four districts. It supports 16,397 (2014) beneficiaries, providing them group-based loans without collateral and individual saving skills. The loans are managed by the women’s groups, that provide them to individuals and the group has to monitor the repayment of their members.
3. Micro enterprise development.
4. Skill training - in different subjects such as technology improvement, production, according to the needs of the market.

Manushi supports around 18,000 beneficiaries in total:
- 16,397 women from different districts for the micro credit programme. Most of them are from low income family, single women, widows, disadvantaged and marginalized, housewives.
- 1,200 regular producers, women and men, sometimes up to 1,300 to 1,500 depending upon the market demand. 20 full-time producers are “in house” producers which mean they produce in the office in Kathmandu, the other ones are producing from their home.
The “in house” producers receive a fix monthly salary of Rs. 12,000 (95 euros) + some facilities as insurance, food, transportation.
The other producers are paid per piece but their salary is more than the minimum base salary from the government.

Manushi finances its programmes thanks to export to fair trade buyers and commercial buyers and the marketing of products from their small producers.
Regarding the design of the products, they receive technical support from the fair trade buyers and commercial buyer that apply fair trade principles.

Manushi’s action covers the following districts:
Sindhupalchok- Micro Credit
Nuwakot- Micro Credit
Kathmandu- Micro Credit, Handicrafts
Dolakha- Micro Credit
Janakpur- Mithila art and crafts
Nawalparashi- Natural Fibre
Lalitpur- Handicraft
Bhaktapur- Handicraft.

It employs 14 people working at their head office and 20 “in house” producers.

Manushi has already received an e-marketing training in August 2014 from a Planète Urgence’s volunteer.
This project has allowed Manushi to start working with new buyers.

To support Manushi in the extension of its range of products to develop and maintain its partnerships with Fair Trade and commercial buyers.

Currently Manushi’s buyers are doing the design of the products they order, and Manushi’s staff or the producers only sometimes develop new designs on their own.

However, by developing by themselves their ranges of products, Manushi is hoping to develop partnerships with more Fair Trade and commercial buyers and maintain their current partnership. It will allow Manushi to give regular work to the producers, which is currently not the case, and to employ more producers as well.

Therefore, Manushi would need the support from a professional product development designer in fashion clothes, accessories and bags for the European market.

Manushi is using a large range of natural raw material for the production of clothes, bags and accessories:
Hemp
Banana Fiber
Bamboo
Bead
Natural dye
Bone
Cotton+Silk
Raw Silk
Cotton Knitting
Felt
Plastic
Recycle Silk
Synthetic Leather
Wool

Currently Manushi has 12 Fair Trade buyers and 2 commercial buyers answering to Fair Trade principles. They have catalogues of products to share with their buyers or potential buyers; or they send them a CD presenting their products. They have a show room in Katmandu.
They also just developed a new website: http://www.manushiarts.com/

But Manushi do not have professional designers working in the organization to develop new products or diversify the existing products.

Manushi is looking for a professional designer and/or product developer to help them diversify their range of products by:
- Creating new designs in men and women fashion, accessories, and bags;
- Identifying new types of products;
- If possible identifying new natural raw material available locally (fabric research);
- Potentially developing a collection of products.

Manushi do not have a professional designer working in the organization and a local designer does not have the western standard required.
They would like a professional designer to develop their products, their range of products and the natural raw material used.

A succession of several volunteers might be required to fulfill the objective overall.

Participants / Name: Women staff of Manushi and indoor producers.

Participants / Number: 10

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

The mission is organized for 10 women staff of Manushi and indoor producers:

Name, Qualification, Current Position:
1. Anu Dhakhwa, M.A, Board Member and Designer
2. Anita Bajracharya, S.L.C, Assistant Designer
3. Anjalee Shakya, I.A, Cutting (indoor producer)
4. Kanchan Putuwar, Under SLC, Swing (indoor producer)
5. Ganga Maharjan, Under SLC, Swing (indoor producer)
6. Tirtha Laxmi Maharjan, Under SLC, Swing (indoor producer)
7. Sangita Basnet, Under SLC, Sewing (indoor producer)
8. Benju Rai, Under SLC, Sewing (indoor producer)
9. Meena Limbu, Under SLC, Sewing (indoor producer)
10. Meenu Sthapit, Under SLC, Cutting (indoor producer)
+ potentially outdoor producers to be defined.

Participants / Training in the field request

They can read and speak English but have never been trained in design.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

Manushi staff will pick up the volunteer from airport by car and accompany him/her to the place of accommodation (20min to 1h depending on traffic)

Accommodation & food:

The Planète Urgence volunteer will be accommodated in a guest house in Lalitpur, with individual room, bathroom, electricity, mosquito net.

Means:

The training will be held in Manushi’s office in Lalitpur. Visit to project areas can be organized if needed.
The training room is equipped with a white board, paper board, computers, projectors, Internet.

Logistics:

Training will be held from 10:00 am to 3:00 pm
The office is located 15 min by taxi from accommodation.
Breakfasts and dinners will be taken in restaurants or at the guest house, lunches will be organized in Manushi’s office.

The mission can happen anytime except during national festivals (weeks 40 and 43 in October).

Comment:

Profile of the volunteer: experience in development product design and natural material research.

No1822 | Nepal | Design | Children and Youth First (CYF)

Support CYF organization to improve the designs of their products and develop new design of bags.

This intervention will help CYF to develop their range of Dhaka products and improve their income to support more their beneficiaries, their school and be more independent.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

     

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Children and Youth First (CYF) was created in 2009 by Haushala Thapa at the age of 21 when she found the need to give chidren the access to education.

Haushala Thapa first got involved in social work field when she participated and led a campaign at the age of 15 against eve teasing and harassment towards girls, a project that was then run by SAVE THE CHILDREN UK. Then after a year she got the opportunity to work with street children and create a drama along with the street children in 2002.
She then completed her bachelor’s degree in social work from Nepal and also worked with the government of Nepal under the Central Child Welfare Board for the lost and found children department as a project manager for a year.

CYF was created when Haushala rescued 14 children from an orphanage that was keeping the children in the worst condition, for the benefit of the manager.

CYF addresses issues that are directly related to children, families and women who have minimal access to education and are economically challenged.

To work with these issues, the organisation has a school based in Kausaltar Bhaktapur called “LIFE VISION ACADEMY” that helps to educate children from economically challenged families or broken homes with abusive parents, by providing them hostel facility.
The school also provides education to children who come from families that cannot bear the minimal cost for their education, by helping to sustain the school’s expenditure.

CYF helps to provide quality education to these children, with the use of practical tools for education and child-teacher participation.

Beneficiary children are either identified by CYF or referred to the organisation by local organisations or friends as needing immediate attention.
During the identification process, CYF interviews the child’s responsible guardian, collects their history and problem of why the organisation needs to support the child. They collect information of the child as well on his/her medical conditions, if he/she has been abused physically or sexually. Then the guardians, who are the blood related relatives or single parents sign a responsibility agreement where they must visit their child once a month and support their child’s education by buying stationeries’ or anything that a child would need in school. CYF does this in order to create a sense of responsibility and attachment with the child.
CYF’s work is to support the child for education that is not just based on text books but also practical, at the same time the organisation makes sure their guardians are working and raising their living standards.

The beneficiary children mainly come from remote areas of Nepal, mostly from the Sindhupalchowk and Solukhumbu area.

To date, CYF provides education to 32 underprivileged children through hostel facility and has also been able to set up a skill training space for the children’s mothers and women who want to work.

CYF currently works on enhancing and bringing quality to the education it has been providing to the children, working on “how” to teach children practically and not just via their books.

Another activity is the skill training project which was started in January 2013: CYF provides knitting, craft making and stitching training to mainly mothers of the children supported by the organisation and to women/youth who come from economically challenged backgrounds. CYF currently has 2 trainers for knitting and stitching and 8 to 15 women are trained in a month.

CYF currently supports directly and indirectly 60 people (children, women and teachers).

Activities are funded with the help of friends and family living in the United Kingdom, United States and via a branch organisation that has been setup in Austria. Friends and family help the organisation by sponsoring a child or by helping to buy materials needed for the school and CYF also supports activities by organising various fundraising events in Kathmandu and abroad. Recently CYF has also been able to support some activities by the sales of handmade products.

Improve two of their products and Diversified, develop the existing collection and make attractive products to increase the sales of CYF products. This extra-income will allow CYF to support more the school, the women part of the project and include more women in the project.

By developing a larger range of products and by increasing the sales, CYF is planning to open their own shop.

In June 2014, CYF has received the support of a Planète Urgence’s volunteers who have helped to develop new bags and dolls design with recycled material available in CYF (from donations).
In August 2014, CYF has received the support of two more Planète Urgence’s volunteers coming from the fashion field (Italy). With them CYF have developed a new collection of product with Dhaka fabric: a travelling bag, a tote bag, a Mac-book bag, an I-pad bag, a card wallet and a passport case (pictures can be sending on request). At the beginning these products were sold in Nepal, then they are exported mainly to UK where they are quite popular.
From summer 2015 CYF has extended its sales in USA and launched www.haushala.com as an online store.

Since this last mission with Planète Urgence’s volunteers, CYF has concentrated the production in the Dhaka products. But continue the production of the camera bag and a travelling bad develop during the first project with Planète Urgence.

The development of the project (sales increased by 20% from May 2015) has allowed CYF to include already 5 more women in the project and would like to integrate more and provide them a better income.

This kind of competency is available locally but the cost of a local designer is high and CYF does not have the fund for that. Most of the funds are for the school, to buy material for the production and for the salary of the organization’s employees.

CYF is looking for a professional designer to help them to diversify their range/collection of products:
- Improve/make more functional the Mac-book and the I-pad bags (from feedbacks of customers),
- Identified new type of products with Dhaka fabric and synthetic leather: one bag-pack and one tote bag; in order to develop the collection,
- Research on new designs with cotton fabric to develop one bag-pack and a tote bag.

? The volunteer will also have to help the trainer to complete a recording book to describe the new products (measures, patterns, fabrics used...).
?
Few volunteers might be required.

Participants / Name: Stitching trainers, CYF director and women involved in production

Participants / Number: 7

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

This mission is organised for the two stitching trainers of CYF who are working full time and for the director of CYF, Haushala (they are together creating the design) and for the women part of the production (some are the children’s mother supported by CYF’s school).

Participants / Training in the field request

They have a school lever equivalent to middle school, under SLC (équivalent Seconde). Except Haushala who had higher education.
They can understand English and have improved their level with the previous volunteers.

Participants / Motivation

They would like to take part of the mission to develop their collection of bags and increase their sales.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

The volunteer will be welcome by a staff of CYF.

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will stay in At Home Guest House in the area of Sanepa, near Children Youth First office and factory.

Means:

The volunteer will work in CYF office/workshop.

A white board, a computer with internet, a printer, two sewing mechanical machines and two sewing electrical machines are available in the workshop and available for the volunteer.

Logistics:

Volunteer will work in the “workshop” in CYF office in Sanepa, Lalitpur.

5/6 women are working from Sunday to Wednesday (4 days a week) in office.

8/9 are working from home. They are coming on Sundays to pick up orders and material.

The volunteer will work mainly with the two trainers. The women interested to learn about designing and research on new design and shape of products will take part of the mission.

The women are available 4 days a week too, 5 hours a day. Sunday from 9am to 2pm. They will be able to join on Saturdays for the training period.

The mission can happen anytime except during special celebrations and public holiday (in October, weeks 41, 42 and in November, week 45).

The volunteer will have lunch at CYF office with the staff and the women or in restaurants, and other meals will be taken at the guest house or in restaurants.

CYF office is at walking distance from the guest house.

Comment:

Children and Youth First is looking for a professional designer.

No1722 | Nepal | Education | Children and Youth First (CYF)

Training of CYF teachers in participatory education

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

     

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Children and Youth First (CYF) was created in 2009 by Haushala Thapa at the age of 21 when she found the need to give chidren the access to education.

Haushala Thapa first got involved in social work field when she participated and led a campaign at the age of 15 against eve teasing and harassment towards girls, a project that was then run by SAVE THE CHILDREN UK. Then after a year she got the opportunity to work with street children and create a drama along with the street children in 2002.
She then completed her bachelor’s degree in social work from Nepal and also worked with the government of Nepal under the Central Child Welfare Board for the lost and found children department as a project manager for a year.

CYF was created when Haushala rescued 14 children from an orphanage that was keeping the children in the worst condition, for the benefit of the manager.

CYF addresses issues that are directly related to children, families and women who have minimal access to education and are economically challenged.

To work with these issues, the organisation has a school based in Kausaltar Bhaktapur called “LIFE VISION ACADEMY” that helps to educate children from economically challenged families or broken homes with abusive parents, by providing them hostel facility.
The school also provides education to children who come from families that cannot bear the minimal cost for their education, by helping to sustain the school’s expenditure.

CYF helps to provide quality education to these children, with the use of practical tools for education and child-teacher participation.

Beneficiary children are either identified by CYF or referred to the organisation by local organisations or friends as needing immediate attention.
During the identification process, CYF interviews the child’s responsible guardian, collects their history and problem of why the organisation needs to support the child. They collect information of the child as well on his/her medical conditions, if he/she has been abused physically or sexually. Then the guardians, who are the blood related relatives or single parents sign a responsibility agreement where they must visit their child once a month and support their child’s education by buying stationeries’ or anything that a child would need in school. CYF does this in order to create a sense of responsibility and attachment with the child.
CYF’s work is to support the child for education that is not just based on text books but also practical, at the same time the organisation makes sure their guardians are working and raising their living standards.

The beneficiary children mainly come from remote areas of Nepal, mostly from the Sindhupalchowk and Solukhumbu area.

To date, CYF provides education to 32 underprivileged children through hostel facility and has also been able to set up a skill training space for the children’s mothers and women who want to work.

CYF currently works on enhancing and bringing quality to the education it has been providing to the children, working on “how” to teach children practically and not just via their books.

Another activity is the skill training project which was started in January 2013: CYF provides knitting, craft making and stitching training to mainly mothers of the children supported by the organisation and to women/youth who come from economically challenged backgrounds. CYF currently has 2 trainers for knitting and stitching and 8 to 15 women are trained in a month.

CYF currently supports directly and indirectly 60 people (children, women and teachers).

Activities are funded with the help of friends and family living in the United Kingdom, United States and via a branch organisation that has been setup in Austria. Friends and family help the organisation by sponsoring a child or by helping to buy materials needed for the school and CYF also supports activities by organising various fundraising events in Kathmandu and abroad. Recently CYF has also been able to support some activities by the sales of handmade products.

To train the CYF school teachers, therefore helping its students having a participatory role when they learn.

The requested support targets teachers in the Montessori level (from preschool level up to grade five – (niveau maternelle à CM2)). This is a critical time when children tend to learn many things.

However, CYF sees the lack of participatory education in its class rooms. Its teachers need training about how to make teaching interactive and fun, both for teachers and the students.
CYF feels that children learn the most when they are 3 to 7 years old and this is a crucial time when they need the proper education but in CYF school, due to lack of budget and salary, it is difficult to hire teachers who have had advanced teacher training.
Therefore teachers at CYF need training, especially at Kindergarten level, for them to use different materials and art to teach the children.

CYF feels that teaching and learning is all about participation, attitude and aptitude, which they hope volunteer(s) can teach the teachers.

The volunteer(s) should transfer teaching skills that include the creativity and participation of children, to be transferred to the teachers.

The volunteer(s) should work towards the teachers to help them realise that a teacher is not just an employee but a person who has the power to encourage and influence students. If a student fails, they need to realize it was partly the fault of the teacher as well.

In Nepal, teachers only use the school books and do a lot of repetition of words but do not help the child to understand what that word means. CYF therefore wants the volunteer(s) to help teachers in their school use practical methods of teaching and not just depend on theory books.

The mission will be based on an initial stage of 2 days of observation of classes, to identify what the volunteer will have to focus on.

The volunteer(s) will closely work for the first 2 days with the Founder Director Ms Haushala Thapa & the Principal Mr Wangyal Zimba to get a better understanding of what changes they hope to see after the training.

This support is available locally but being a private school run by an NGO, CYF is not allowed for such support. Only government school teachers and schools are given these training. Other trainings would be too expensive.

Expected results:
The changes expected after the mission are that teachers will be more pro active and will prepare for their classes to be more practical as well.
CYF expects that teachers will practise what they have learnt and involve children as a participatory role in the class. CYF wants to see the teachers comfortable to positive changes that help a child grow in class.

For the organisation, CYF feels that through the mission it will be able to provide “quality” education to the children supported. Their main objective is to help these children have access to “quality” education but they feel this can only be achieved when the teachers are trained accordingly.

Participants / Name: CYF teachers

Participants / Number: 6

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

This mission is organised for the teachers, but carried along with the children through practice in the classroom.

In this mission 5 women and 1 man will participate, from 27 to 56 years old.

The Kindergarten level, which is also called the Preschool, has 3 levels: Nursery, Lower Kg and Upper Kg (3 niveaux de maternelle). Then the kids move on to grade 1 (CP) and the school runs until grade 5 (CM2).

The preschool has 3 teachers and there is one teacher in each class after.

The children in Preschool are 3 to 5 years old.
In grade 1: age 6 to age 8,
In grade 2: age 8,
In grade 3: age 9 to 10,
In grade four age 10 to 11,
In grade five age 11 to 12.

Participants / Training in the field request

They can read and speak in English and all have a bachelor degree.

They never received a training specific to participatory education.

Participants / Motivation

They wish to take part to this training as it will help them to teach better and also help them personally on their attitude towards teaching.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

CYF office assistant will welcome the volunteer at airport. A taxi will be used to go from the airport to the school (about 15 minutes).

Accommodation & food:

Volunteer(s) will sleep in a room located 2 minutes away from the school, which can accommodate 2 persons at a time (two separate beds).

There is no internet in the room, but it is accessible in the school. There is electricity but no backup power (Nepal is subject to electricity cuts quite regularly but variable depending on the season).

Means:

Available material: white board, computer and printer.
Markers, flip paper board, projector and other material will be provided if needed for each mission.
There is no backup power for electricity cuts.

Logistics:

Volunteers will work in Kausaltar, Bhaktapur in LIFE VISION ACADEMY.

The volunteers will be staying near the school. The distance between the school and the accommodation is just 2 minutes by walk.

Meals will be taken at the school and in the host house

During school time, the teachers can adjust to the time for trainings from 7:30am to 9am in the morning and evening from 3:30pm to 5:30pm during school hours from Sunday to Friday with Saturday break.

When the mission falls under school holiday period, then the mission will continue in the same days but from 10am till 3pm with an hour break of lunch, as suggested for July.

Comment:

CYF is looking for volunteers with experience in education and that can adjust in a small school. Depending on profile, focus will be given on preschool level or upper classes.

No1943 | Nepal | Special Education | Down Syndrome Society Nepal (DSSN)

Training in pedagogy and special education for the teachers of Down Syndrome Society Nepal’s day care centre and its partners

To train in pedagogy and special education the teachers of DSSN’s Satyam day care centre in Kathmandu and their partner day care centres, to allow them to provide good socio-professional integration to the children and young adults with Down Syndrome and intellectual disabilities that they support.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

     

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Down Syndrome Society Nepal is an NGO created in 2010 by Shila Thapa and 8 other parents of intellectual disabled children. DSSN protects and promotes the basic human rights of the intellectually disabled children.

Despite how relatively common Down syndrome is, in Nepal it is not understood as a chromosomal disorder. Nepalese doctors and nurses are often not well informed and lack basic understanding of the symptoms; leading to tragic misdiagnosis. Often children are not properly diagnosed and never treated as they should be. As Down syndrome is associated with many serious physical problems (heart defects, poor eyesight, etc.) that demand urgent care, the lives of many Down’s children are simply lost without access to relevant medical practitioners and counsellors.

Shila Thapa, the founder of the organization, lost her brother to meningitis at age six as her mother was not educated enough to react in the right way. That was a powerful lesson to Shila: mothers need education and access to care for their children.
In 2002, Shila gave birth to her second child. After a lengthy struggle and multiple consultations with doctors, her son was diagnosed with Down Syndrome and a heart condition.

Following this and due to lack of treatment in Nepal, Shila had to go to India in order for her son to undergo operations for his survival. This allowed her to learn more about the condition and Down syndrome’s support groups in India.

Back in Nepal, Shila had to train herself in physiotherapy to be able to answer to her child’s need and this led her to open a clinic to support other children with Down Syndrome.

In 2005, she founded the Down Syndrome Support Centre—the first in Nepal, now called Satyam Day Care Centre (SDDC).

Thanks to her mother-in-law’s support, Shila was able to cater to her sons need and to other needy children with Down Syndrome, whose parents cannot afford treatment. And so, in 2010 she started Down Syndrome Society Nepal with the help of other parents, especially of mothers.

Since 2005, in a country where a word for Down syndrome does not exist, Shila has reached out to parents, the medical community, the government and a network of citizen organizations (COs) working with disability, to make children with Down Syndrome and their parents a vibrant, empowered community with the resources and education to improve the lives of their children and influence Nepalese society.

Shila has employed a two-pronged institutional strategy by operating a support centre and day care centre, as well as partnering with other disability groups and lobbying the government of Nepal.

The support centre is responsible for sensitization programs on Down syndrome amongst parents, medical practitioners, medical institutions, educational institutes, and the government. Shila informs professionals and the general public that Down syndrome is not a disease but a genetic condition.

In Nepal, children with Down syndrome are viewed as retarded, dangerous, and even “mad” and their mothers are often discriminated against and ostracized. Through programs organized by the centre, Shila is creating spaces where children with Down syndrome and “normal” children interact and learn from each other. She encourages families and society to celebrate these children and their talents. She does not force activities, but develops their natural talents.

The centre organizes public programs as a mean to raise funds while increasing awareness and also includes celebrities and lawmakers in her awareness programs. In-kind support is provided by volunteers who offer many therapies to the children while large organizations contribute with equipment, books, donation boxes and business-plan consulting to Shila.

The support centre also runs a vocational training program for children over twelve-years-old to enable them to become economically productive members of society.
Named Prothshaan, this program focuses overall on enhancing the lives of people with Down syndrome and people with intellectual disability, providing quality instruction and meaningful work.

The centre provides Physiotherapy, an Early Stimulation Program, Occupational Therapy, Speech Therapy and routine vaccinations to the children. The centre also provides classes, music and dance therapy, exercise, and other services to Down’s children.

Currently, Satyam day care centre supports 15 children or young adults with Down Syndrome or intellectual disabilities and touches around 250 families via 15 partner day care centres.

The current Satyam Day Care Centre services are:
- Special education: education of the children in adapted way for each one.
- Medical general check-up and support for special medical needs.
- Speech therapy done by Shila as she has attended a workshop in Singapore.
- Dance therapy done by a Nepali volunteer twice a week.
- Music therapy done by a Nepali volunteer once a week.
- Occupational therapy: day to day activities which means life skill, daily routine activities.
- Physiotherapy done by Shila who follow a course for a year.
- Self Help Skills: division among the children of daily work as cleaning, cooking, washing clothes.
- Early intervention: detection of Down syndrome and activity with young children (sensation of cold/hot, texture, noises…).
- Physical Training and Sports.
- Educational tours: recreational activities out of the centre one Friday a month to claim the “Right to go out” (cinema, park…).

12 persons are working in the centre: the director (Shila Thapa), the principal of the centre, 4 teachers, 1 supervisor, 1 administration officer, 1 driver, 1 cooker, 1 kitchen assistant and 1 office boy.

3 teachers have received a teacher training from the Japanese Cooperation but not specifically in special education.

A new teacher has been hired from end of March 2014. She has received training in early childhood stimulation and on how to develop activities for children with various disabilities.

The principal of the school also acts in the education program and has received a Montessori training.

The 15 children coming daily to the center are from 4 to 25 years old :3 have 24 and 25 years old, 3 have between 14 to 16 years old. The rest of them are from 4 to 12 years old.

To train in pedagogy and special education the “special” teachers of DSSN and partner centres, working with children and young adults with Down Syndrome or intellectual disability.

DSSN has a team of 4 teachers in its day-care centre in Kathmandu and has 15 partner day-care centres all over Nepal that it helped to get started.

With a view to spread skills to a maximum of people working with Down Syndrome or intellectually disabled children, DSSN will invite 1 or 2 staffs of each partner day care centre to join the training as well. 5 day care centers are in the Kathmandu valley and 10 other are out the valley.

The members and founders of the organization, as well as some of the teachers, are parents of the beneficiaries of the centres. They are doing their best to give maximum support to the children/youths and to help them to develop as much as possible their capacities, but they were not trained in special education and pedagogy and therefore on how to attend the needs of children with disabilities, which are very specific. They are not equipped with the tools that exist to accompany these children and their development.

Therefore, they believe that getting training in pedagogy and special education will help them to develop specific activities in the centres and promote the blossoming of the children/youths, as well as help to develop their intellectual, affective and physical potentials, and to develop their daily social and professional autonomy.

Overall, it will allow them to provide a better support to the children and youths, as well as to better guide and support their families.

It should particularly focus on helping teachers to better understand the difficulties of the children and youths, evaluate the possibility of stimulation and learning process, develop educative approaches or therapeutic ways, and help the children and youths in a cognitive, affective and social way in order to allow them the best socio-professional integration possible.

DSSN expects a training in pedagogy and special education which will allow the teachers to:
- Adopt a pedagogy which will help the children and youths to realize their potentials by creating conditions allowing them to reveal and ensure their capacity;
- Develop an individual pedagogy approach for each child and youth and create an educative plan with objectives and expectations (pedagogic procedures);
- Adjust the pedagogic activities according to the progress and evaluate the acquisition in the different fields of development and learning (result of pedagogic activities);
- Manage the organization of the educative environment in the structure;
- Adapt individual and group activities for the optimal development of cognitive capacities, sensitivity, cooperation way, solidarity and civism to increase the children and youths’ autonomy.

Using the material available locally at DDSN, the volunteer will be able to explain to the trainees how to implement activities in the realms of music, sports, arts… according to his/her knowledge in said activities.

Several missions might be required to cover all partner day-care centers’ teachers, to avoid overcrowded trainings (participants will be kept to a maximum of 15).

Participants / Name: Teachers and staff

Participants / Number: 15

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

4 teachers + 1 or 2 staffs of partner day care centres (around 10/15 centres) for a maximum of 15 participants.

Only few participants might speak and understand English, an interpreter among the board members will be provided to support the volunteer.

13 of them are women.

Participants / Training in the field request

Among the 4 teachers of DSSN Kathmandu, 3 have received simple teaching training. The 4th teacher, hired from March 2014, has received a training to manage specific activities for children with intellectual disability.

None of the teachers from the other centres has received such kind of training.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

Shila Thapa (founder/director of DSSN) will pick up the volunteer at the airport in a private car. It will take approximately 30-40 minutes to accommodation, depending on traffic.

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will stay at a guesthouse in an individual room with a private bathroom with electricity and free wifi. The guesthouse will be located in the touristic area of Kathmandu, Thamel.

Means:

The volunteer will work at the DSSN day care centre in Baluwatar, Kathmandu.
DSSN has an office with 1 desk and 1 computer equipped with Office 2007 and Internet.
DSSN does not have a back-up for electricity, so activities requiring the use of a computer should be planned according to the load-shedding schedule at the time of the mission.
There is a paper board.

Other material can also be used to work on the activities :
- Music instruments: Drum set, guitar, key board, Mouth Organ, Nepali instrument Harmonium, Madal and Sarangi.
- Games: Badminton, Basket ball, Shot-put, Ca-ram board and puzzles.
- Art Materials: a few only is available, more might be purchased prior to the mission according to needs.

All this material can be used by the volunteer during the mission.

Logistics:

The mission can happen anytime expect during national holidays: Dashain and Tihar (weeks 40 and 43).

All daily transportation can be done by walking (15 to 20 minutes) or by taxi.
The volunteer will work from 10am to 5pm from Monday to Friday. He/she can work on Sunday as well, which is a working day in Nepal.

The volunteer can have lunch in the centre. Breakfasts and dinners will be taken outside in restaurants.

Satyam Day Care Center will arrange for the accommodation and meals of the partners’ participants within the center.

Comment:

DSSN is looking for volunteer(s) with degree and experience in special education for children with intellectual disability.

No1834 | Nepal | Project Management | Independent Living Center for PWDs Kathmandu (CIL-Kathmandu)

Training in report and proposal writing for the Center for Independent Living staff members

This training will help to build the capacity of CIL-Kathmandu staff members to produce quality reports and write proposal to get funds.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

     

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

The promotion of the independent living concept in Nepal is led by young energetic people with disabilities under the leadership of Mr. Krishna Gautam, who is himself disabled.

They established the Centre for Independent Living-Kathmandu for Persons with Disabilities in 2006. Mr. Krishna Gautam got an opportunity to get acquainted with the concept of independent living during a 10 month course, the 'DUSKIN Leadership Training" in Japan.
He is passionate in the promotion of the concept of Independent living and in changing the society to one with equal opportunities for people who have severe disabilities.
He has a 15 year-long experience in the disability movement. He is the founder president of Handicapped New Life Center Banke, the first DPO (Disabled People Organisation) in the Banke district. Similarly, he was the first Regional President of the National Federation of the Disabled Nepal and is also an ex-member of the Community-Based Rehabilitation National Network. He is currently a member of the Asia Pacific Network of Independent Living, the World Disability Union and the International Independent Living Network.

The main objective behind the creation of the Centre for Independent Living organisation is to shift the paradigm of disability from charity based one to one based on rights.
It was established for the promotion and strengthening of the values, principles and practices of independent living throughout Nepal. The Independent Living Concept is a totally new concept in Nepal.
The genuine objective of the organisation is to empower Persons With Disabilities (PWDs) and to make them productive so that, although having severe disabilities, they can live with dignity and independently in their chosen community, enjoying the fullness of their human rights in a barrier free environment.

To achieve this objective, from the beginning, CIL-Kathmandu has played a key role in providing independent living skills, personal assistant services, assistive devices, employment or social security services as well as creating accessible environment in communities.
The organisation has its own principles and strategic plan to solve these issues.

It is making regular and active advocacy with the government to revise and rewrite existing laws, legislation, guidelines, policy and programmes in favour of persons with severe disabilities in Nepal.

In addition, it organizes regular activities such as peer counselling, ILP (Individual Learning Plan), PAS (Personal Assistant Service), informational and referral services to persons with disabilities and runs various types of trainings in favour of persons with disabilities.

Throughout its activities, CIL-K was able to increase the participation of PWDs in the decision making process of the government, to enhance their daily living skills and to develop role models for self advocacy.

On an annual basis, about 500 PWDs are getting direct and indirect support from CIL activities. The target groups are persons with disabilities, their parents and stakeholders.

The main funding resources of CIL-Kathmandu are the members’ fees, a fund from the Nepalese Government, Local Development Agencies, National and International donor agencies and private sectors in Nepal. CIL-K also gets some financial support from the Ministry of Women, Children and Social Welfare, Mainstream Association Japan, Asia Pacific Network of Independent Living (APNIL) and KIOS, the Finnish NGO Foundation for Human Rights.

Mainstream associations provide technical support like skill development, leadership, peer counselling, personal assistant trainings etc. They provide CIL-K trainings in Nepal as well as in Japan. They also provide an internship program.

The main target areas were initially three districts that belonged to Kathmandu valley. But realizing the need and scope of IL concept, CIL-K incorporated sister organisations working in 11 other districts of Nepal.

CIL-K employs 10 regular staff and gets punctual support from 7 volunteer staff.

To enhance and strengthen the capacity of CIL-Kathmandu staff members to produce reports and write proposals.

CIL-Kathmandu staffs are involved in many different activities, case studies and participate in trainings, workshops, seminars, advocacy programs…

Due to a lack of knowledge on report writing, the CIL-Kathmandu staffs fail to produce quality reports and to do good presentations. On the other hand they are able to write concept notes on small projects, but they have to hire experts or consultants to write proposals.

A training in report and proposal writing will allow CIL-Kathmandu staff members to improve their capacity to document their activities and to be able to share easily information to their partners.

It will also allow them to produce proposals on their own to get funds from INGOs, local governments or international cooperation (EC, USAid…).

The Planète Urgence volunteer will have to intervene on different aspects:
1. Analyze the current way CIL-Kathmandu documents its activities.
2. Train staff members about the content of a quality report/proposal according to the target and the goal.
3. Help staff members to improve their current reports by giving advices (presentation, key information…) to include according to the involvement of each staff and their implication in the different activities.
4. Advice them for the creation of tools/reports to document activities they are not used to documenting so far.

Through this training the staff members will be more efficient in documentation recording and it will enhance their capacity to work efficiently and have a better sharing of information internally and with partners, media...
The training will also allow them to be able to write by themselves proposals and get funds from INGOs and other donor agencies.

Few volunteers might be required to complete the overall objective, according to the feedback provided by the first volunteer that will intervene.

Participants / Name: CIL-Kathmandu staff members

Participants / Number: 15

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

The training will be for the staff members of CIL-Kathmandu. Most of them have disabilities (physical).

Participants / Training in the field request

Few of them can read and speak English well and will help for interpretation to other participants.
Thay have studied in higher secondary level to master degree but did not receive any specific training in office management.

Participants / Motivation

Thanks to the intervention, the staff of CIL-Kathmandu would like to get skills to produce quality reports and will be able to write proposal. They wish to participate in this kind of training to feel more confident and be more efficient in this field and to be able to enhance the activities of the organization and smoothen their mission in long term.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

The volunteer will be welcome at the airport by a staff member of CIL-Kathmandu or by Planète Urgence’s representative.

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will stay in Planète Urgence’s guest room in Patan.

Means:

The volunteer will work in CIL-Kathmandu’s office.
Whiteboard, computers equipped with Windows XP/Windows7, video-projector, Internet connection are available in CIL-Kathmandu and available for the volunteer.

Logistics:

The mission can happen during the working time of the organization from Sunday to Friday (9 AM to 5 PM) except during special celebrations and public holidays during which the mission can't occur (in October, weeks 41, 42 and in November, week 45)

The volunteer can have lunch at the CIL office with the staff or PU office.
Other meals can be taken at the PU office on request or in restaurants
CIL-Kathmandu office is at walking distance of PU office.

Comment:

CIL-Kathmandu needs a well experienced volunteer in reporting and proposal writing.

No2156 | Nepal | Management | Engage

Help ENGAGE to develop a coaching approach to support their beneficiaries

Support ENGAGE to develop a coaching approach suitable for the organization in order to maximize the skills and abilities of their sport players/beneficiaries. The approach will help ENGAGE to develop and design its own way of coaching their beneficiaries.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

     

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

ENGAGE was created by Kalpana Gurung and her husband Simone Galimberti together with friends in 2011 in order to promote and strengthen a culture of service in Nepal.
It started as a very informal endeavor and along the time, it has become more and more formalized and it is now legally recognized with Kathmandu District office in 2011 and affiliated with the government in 2013.
The organisation has been created for the promotion of volunteerism, solidarity and self help in the sector of disability. ENGAGE believes that local volunteerism can be a powerful means to empower youths living with disabilities. By volunteering, a youth living with disabilities can prove to the society that s/he can be an active citizen. ENGAGE has a clear simple theory of change that can prove how a youth with disabilities can emerge and become a leader.
The vision of ENGAGE is an inclusive society for all through volunteering.
ENGAGE wishes to transform the lives of young people with disabilities through sport, leadership and learning experiences.

ENGAGE aims at the establishing an inclusive society based on more just, equitable communities all around Nepal. ENGAGE implements, facilitates and supports the creation of meaningful community services experiences with an exclusive focus on disabilities.

ENGAGE has been working in the sector of disabilities since its outset, building relationships between able bodied persons and youths living with disabilities.
ENGAGE runs one program called ENGAGE Corps, a part time volunteering experience open to local youths with and without disabilities. ENGAGE Corps is implemented through different projects:
- Guiding Hands: learning support to visually impaired youths;
- Coaching4Fun: sport based volunteering service targeting for the time being youths who are wheelchair users. ENGAGE facilitates the formation of teams of youths with disabilities that are encouraged not only to play but also to grow personally and professionally with the support of ENGAGE;
- Coaching4Learning (now phased out): a pilot project where ENGAGE volunteer engage in after school activities in one school with the students at primary level who needed support in Nepali, mathematics and English.

By focusing on Sport, Leadership and Learning, ENGAGE offers a pathway for self development of its main beneficiaries: youths living with disabilities.

ENGAGE working approach and theory of change regarding it project Coaching4Fun:
- 1st level of Change (Networking/playing/learning): The beneficiaries, youth with disabilities start their journey by being supported or helped in the sector of Sport, Leadership and Learning. They are encouraged to play in a sport team (currently ENGAGE is focusing on wheelchair basketball, in future in blind cricket and they hope for much more sport);
- 2nd level of Change (Empowerment): Selected players are invited to become ENGAGE Corps. By becoming role models, volunteerism offers them a first experience of empowerment in sector of Sport, Leadership and Learning. They will coach a mixed junior team in their preferred sport discipline bringing together through sport children with and without disabilities (to building a more inclusive society).
- 3rd level of Change (Leadership): The best of players/service users turned ENGAGE Corps will be invited to become ENGAGE Fellows. The program aims to nurture the most talented, high potential future leaders among youth living with disabilities with innovative ideas in the field of disabilities.

In short ENGAGE wants to offer a simple pathway where their beneficiaries will: PLAY-COACH-LEAD.

By playing in a team, a youth acquires new skills, s/he establishes new relationships with peers and also through sport, the same person can develop personal and leadership qualities, learning new ways to face and overcome life challenges.
ENGAGE is committed to support this same growth process both at personal and professional levels by offering each youth starting playing in a team supported by ENGAGE a unique form of support called Personalized Development Pathway or PDP. ENGAGE wants to develop a simple approach based on the personalized social support.

ENGAGE employs two staffs full time and one staff part time (they are not getting paid).
So far we have been supporting more than 50 youths living with disabilities.

At the moment ENGAGE does not have any institutional donor. They have been able to collect some money at personal and family levels and few funds were collected through short terms partnerships with local organizations like Change Fusion, NSCISA and NDVS. The Founder and Co-Founder have also used some personal resources to run the organization. ENGAGE Staff also contributed at personal level by working without a salary.

For the time being, also due to lack of funding, ENGAGE is focused only on the Kathmandu Valley with expansions plans in different districts within the next five years.

To support ENGAGE to develop a coaching approach suitable to the organisation as they are starting a new working approach aimed to maximize the skills and abilities of their players. The approach will help ENGAGE to develop and design its own way of coaching the players.

Here is what ENGAGE is planning to do:
1) Support each player in setting her/his personal and professional goals
2) Identify those players who are really serious about achieving their goals
3) Offer to those identified players a special support in the form of ENGAGE Talent Coaches, ETC, a new volunteering position that ENGAGE will soon introduce to ensure that each player is adequately helped in reaching their goals

The ETC acts as personal “Coach” with weekly meeting. As Coach, the ETC trys her/his best to provide guidance, advice and support to his/her assigned player.
This scheme is part of ENGAGE Personalized Development Pathway’s approach.
The PDP will be instrumental to “lift” up the players towards the ENGAGE Pyramid of Change according to the model of 1) Playing 2) Coaching, 3) Leading

As part of ENGAGE new focus in supporting the personal and professional growth of the players, the organisation needs to come up with their own coaching style and modality. The approach will be used by the ENGAGE Talent Coaches, ETCs that will be matched with players undertaking the personalized development pathway.
At the end of the training the ENGAGE Talent Coaches or ETCs will be able to perform their duties in an easy way and most important effective way.
ENGAGE realizes that coaching is a very complex profession. They do not expect that magically overnight all ENGAGE Staff including ETCs will become professional certified coaches. They know that is not possible nor they want to claim to be professional coaches when they are not. But with the help of a real and experienced coach, ENGAGE can come up with its own style and approach of helping their beneficiaries.

ENGAGE has been checking if there is any chapter of the International Coaching Federation established here in Nepal but they did not find it. It might be possible that there are some coaches locally available but they are not aware of them and cannot afford it

The volunteer will support ENGAGE to develop a suitable coaching approach that will be put into practise by it staff and the ETC (ENGAGE Talent Coaches).
Afterwards the participants of the training will be able to:
- Help the players/beneficiaries to discover and understand who they are (WHO),
- Help the players/beneficiaries to identify and clarify what they want (WHAT),
- Help the players/beneficiaries to create and develop strategies to achieve their goals (WHO).

The mission will be instrumental in:
-devising an overall coaching approach for ENGAGE,
-help determine the key competencies of a coach ,
-design a training manual for future ENGAGE Talent Coaches.

Based on ENGAGE understanding and reading they borrow the following definition of coach: “The Coach is a collaborative partner and works with individuals who want to reach set goals and not help emotional issues”.
In their case their future coaches, the ENGAGE Talent Coaches, will be acting as facilitators of change. They will always refer to ENGAGE staff whenever any issue or complication arises. In case of specific needs, under the advice of the ETCs, ENGAGE will mobilize mentors (for those players willing to find a job or start a business or a new venture) or a tutor (for those players still studying).

ENGAGE staff would like to be able, as part of the training, to cover the core competencies promoted by the International Coaching Federation: http://coachfederation.org/credential/landing.cfm?ItemNumber=2206&navItemNumber=576

Participants / Name:

Participants / Number: 10

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

The mission will be organized primarily for ENGAGE staff and for the future ETC who will be recruited.
They will be maximum 10 persons.
They are between 20 years old till 37 years old.

Participants / Training in the field request

They all read and speak English.
All of them have at least bachelor level education.

Some of the participants have studied counseling and psychology and some of them have been doing counseling but none of them have ever taken part to a formal coaching training.

Participants / Motivation

Together they hope to be able to grasp the key concepts of coaching and develop a coaching approach for ENGAGE.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

Staffs of ENGAGE will pick-up the volunteer in airport. It takes about 20 to 30 minutes to the accommodation place.

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will stay in At Home Guest House, in Sanepa area of Lalitpur.

It will take around 5 minutes to reach ENGAGE office daily by walk.

Means:

A whiteboard, computers with Microsoft office 2007 and Internet are available on site. ENGAGE do not have video-projector.

Logistics:

The mission can happen anytime except during Dashain and Tihar festival (weeks 43 and 46).
The volunteer will work in ENGAGE’s office in Lalitpur.

The volunteer will be working has much as s/he wants hours a day from Monday to Friday.
ENGAGE staff does not have fixed working hours. They can start to work from 8am to 10am and usually stop around 6pm. The volunteer can manage the planning of the training within these hours.

Meals can be taken in restaurants around the office. Breakfasts are included in the room cost.

Comment:

Have sounding knowledge of coaching techniques by being certified with the International Federation of Coaching, IFC
http://www.coachfederation.org/.

Possibly the Volunteer sent by Planète Urgence will be at least a Professional Certified Coach (PCC) , the second level of coaching profession http://coachfederation.org/credential/landing.cfm?ItemNumber=2202&navItemNumber=745

No1924 | Nepal | Carpentry | Special Education and Rehabilitation Centre (SERC)

Training to improve the capacity of SERC’s staff to build adapted and adaptive furniture for children with several disabilities.

This training will help the staff of SERC to improve their designing skills to make adapted and adaptive furniture for the children with physical and mental disabilities studying in their centre. It will also reinforce their skills in managing vocational trainings for the youths of the centre, and help them develop a workshop providing this kind of service to a larger number of people.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

     

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

SERC (Special Education and Rehabilitation Centre) is a NGO created in September 2009 by Kalpana Basnet. She is a Paediatric Physiotherapist who works with children with various disorders and helps them overcome their physical disabilities.

Initially, Kalpana worked in Handicap International for 5 years as a physiotherapist. Handicap International helps people with disabilities with many devices and support. However, while working on their programmes, she realised that there were very few facilities that accepted children with disabilities. Especially, schools refused to enrol them as they do not have special education in their curriculum.

Therefore, Kalpana saw that despite all the support given to them, many children with disabilities were wasting their lives due to this lack of educational facilities, adapted to them. So she decided to start a special school for children with several disabilities.

SERC school primarily is a special school providing education and rehabilitation services to children with mild to severe disabilities. Geographically, they operate in Kathmandu, but the children come from many parts of Nepal. In the recent census it was shown that approximately 3% of the population of Nepal are living with disability and require special education.

The main issue is that ‘special education’ in Nepal is a very recent concept. People do not always realize that there are institutions or specialized service providers, who can help these children live a better life in the future. Manpower is one of the most difficult issues for SERC to resolve. There are not enough specialized people in Nepal who work with disabled children. Socially, there is still religious and personal stigma associated with disability.

SERC was created to reply to the need in providing quality education and rehabilitation services to children in one institution. Most of the time the school does not provide the rehabilitative services and the rehabilitation centres do not provide educational services. Because of this, many children were facing difficulties to attend both the institutions.

SERC School provides both of these services under one roof.
SERC does not necessarily implement individual projects. It is primarily a service provider.

In March 2014, there is around 81 children coming to the school regularly. The number of children keeps changing by about 10% all the time since a lot of these children go to hospitals in Nepal or abroad for considerable period of time. SERC also has admissions all year round so the numbers of children also change month by month.

SERC is also affiliated with many organizations to provide rehabilitative services to the children with mild to severe disabilities. Among those 81 children, 22 come during day time in the centre and go back home or in an orphanage at the end of the day.
SERC has a school van for the transportation of the children coming from orphanages.

SERC also had a hostel. 14 of the 81 children going to SERC school were staying in a hostel, as they don’t have family in the valley and their home is too far. However, the hostel is in the process of shutting down because its landlord is selling the building and gave the children a notice to vacate the premises.

10 children have gone to their homes outside the valley already and the 4 children left remain with SERC for the moment. SERC has made a temporary arrangement for them to stay in SERC’s staff's homes as paying guests, but the children will have to go back to their homes eventually until new arrangements can be made.

The hostel will be closed until SERC constructs its own building. For this purpose, SERC has acquired in February 2014 a piece of land about 1100 Sqm very close to Kathmandu Durbar Square for the construction of the hostel, and a new school complex. The construction will start from 15th April 2014.

The current activities of the organization are:
a. Education
a. Mainstream education
b. Special education
c. Vocational education
Vocational education in SERC is mostly informal education for older students. There are classes of sewing/tailoring for older girls, some short courses on candle making (3 days), paper envelope and cards making (2 days), etc. However, SERC wants to establish a regular vocational program in the school to benefit to all the children. It will mainly include painting (starting from March 2014), plumbing, carpentry, cooking and sewing/tailoring.
The staffs hope to be able to open a proper training centre in the coming months.
d. Skills Training
By skills training, it is meant that the children learn some very vital life skills. The skills range from eating, bathing, toileting, brushing, grooming, shopping to more complicated skills like arts and crafts, music, dance etc.
e. Sports and games

b. Rehabilitative services
a. Physical Therapy
b. Speech Therapy
c. Multisensory therapy
d. Occupational therapy
e. Music and dance therapy
Every child or youth follow these activities depending on their needs and their disability. Every beneficiary has a schedule which is decided individually every week or month, deciding on which class to follow. SERC has 7 different teaching rooms and one “Therapy room”. The older children follow vocational training courses if their disability allows them do so.

The total number of children supported in March 2014 is:
a. Current full time students: ~75 children
b. Part time students: 6 children
c. Total children enrolled so far: ~260 full time and part time students
The children come and go in the different classes according to their weekly or monthly established schedule, so it is not possible to detail how many children are in each class.

The children from the centre have:
- mental retardation and delayed development
- down's syndrome
- cerebral Palsy
- hearing impairment
- vision impairment
- speech impairment
- autism
- spinal Bifida
- learning disorders

Many of them have two or more of the above disabilities.

The current children are spread between 7 categories:
- Group A: severe disorders. Age 8 years to 21 years. 9 children with Autism, Cerebral palsy or severe mental retardation.
- Group C1: moderate to severe disorders. Age: 8-16 years. 12 children. Mostly cerebral Palsy.
- Group C2: mild to moderate disorders. Age 12-14. 8 children. Mostly autistic children.
- Group C3: mild to moderate disorders. Age: 3-8 years. 12 children. Mostly delayed development and mental retardation.
- Group D1: mild to moderate disorders. Age 12-16 years. 8 children Mostly delayed development and higher functioning mental retardation.
- Group D2: mild disorders. Age 7-12 years. 14 children. Delayed development, hearing/vision/speech disorders.
- Group D3: borderline disorders. Age 12-16 years. 12 children. Hearing/vision/speech disorders, learning disorders, spinal bifida, congenital deformities.

As each class has its own expertise, the 6 children attending school part time are not assigned to any classes in particular and go to different classes for different reasons.
On top of that some are too young to attend class so they just come for the rehabilitation.

SERC School is primarily funded by the fees paid for the services provided by the school. All funds provided to the school are in the form of scholarships for children or for implementation of particular activities for the children. Almost half of the children receive financial support for their school fees and necessary material…
The financial support is provided by various organisations and individuals. These include:
Liliane Fonds and De Vliegende Meubelmakers (Netherlands), Queen’s University (Canada), Nepal Children’s Trust (United Kingdom), ASHA Foundation (Australia), EcoHimal (Nepal/Germany) and Disabled Newlife Center (Nepal).

There has been very low government support. The staffs have triedto obtain some government grants but it has not been successful so far.

SERC has 24 employees and 20 volunteers: 1 Managing Director, 1 General Manager, 1 SEN (Special Education Needs) Coordinator, 1 Accountant, 1 Physiotherapist, 1 PT Assistant, 1 Speech Assistant, 1 Multisensory Assistant, 7 Teachers, 5 Teaching Assistants, 3 Drivers, 1 Cook.
They are all Nepalese.

To train SERC’s staff to enhance their capacity to make adapted and adaptive furniture for their students.

SERC has two staff members in the school who are currently producing adapted furniture for the children: the technical support staff and the general manager of the school.

They have both attended 2 training courses in carpentry to develop furniture for the children:
- The first one was a course of 2 months in basic carpentry.
- The second one was a specific carpentry training to build adapted furniture in wood, organised by the “Foundation flying furniture makers” from Netherlands.

Currently these two staffs are producing furniture with wood but realized that the use of new material will make the furniture easier to use, will be more adapted for the children and adaptive according to the use and/or as the children grow up.

In Nepal there are no companies providing adapted furniture for the persons with disability. Therefore, the two staffs are trying their best to make it.
By adapted, SERC means furniture which is tailored for the exact needs of a disabled child, e.g. chairs which maintain the child upright or which are shaped according to a child’s deformity…The furniture produced nowadays by SERC does not respond to the exact particular needs of each child.

These two staffs are expecting the Planète Urgence trainer(s) to support them to improve their technique to produce this adapted and adaptive furniture with wood and help them to develop and improve the furniture with new material available locally as plastic, aluminium, and so on.

The aim of this training is to make the utilization of the furniture easier and as much as possible adapted to each child.

They also expect the trainer to help them to adapt the regular furniture that the families have in their homes to make the children’s life at home easier, as well as for their family.

They provide this kind of support for people outside the centre as well, if they request it.

If the volunteer(s) have ideas about improvements which might help make the environment of the school more disabled-friendly, it will also be welcomed.

The volunteer(s) will first have to observe the current adapted furniture made in the centre and will then have to identified, with the help of SERC’s staffs, the material available locally and the techniques to shape/mold these materials.

The volunteer(s) will afterwards develop with the staff new elements to incorporate in the current furniture and/or propose new designs and techniques to develop new ones.
Several missions may be required.
After the missions SERC is expecting the following results:

For the participants
One of the best attribute of the staff currently employed in SERC is they are all very much involved in their work and willing to improve their skills and effectiveness of the support they provide to the children.

The 2 staffs involved in this training will get more knowledge to make adapted and adaptive furniture and in general odd jobs..

The training will help them produce adapted and adaptive furniture.

This intervention will also help them to develop the curriculum of the future carpentry/ furniture making vocational training programme.

If possible, they will also learn how to adapt regular furniture that the children’s families use at home to improve the children’s life outside of school as well.

For the organization
The children will study in better conditions.
The “handling” of the children will be easier for the staff of SERC.
One of the vocational training programmes will be reinforcing to start a new department in the school. SERC does not have for the moment separate staff members for vocational training. They want to train themselves to be able to organise vocational training and hopefully start a new department in the school to develop several vocational trainings.

Participants / Name: Staff members of the school

Participants / Number: 2

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

The mission will be organized for two staff members of the school: the technical support staff and the general manager of the school, who have college degrees.

Participants / Training in the field request

The participants already received two trainings in carpentry:
- 2 months in basic carpentry.
- A specific carpentry training to build adapted furniture in wood organised by the “Foundation flying furniture makers” from Netherlands.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

The volunteer(s) will be welcome by a staff member in a private car.

Accommodation & food:

Volunteer(s) will stay at a guesthouse in an individual room with private bathroom, electricity and free wifi. The guesthouse will be located in the touristic area of Kathmandu, Thamel.

Means:

Volunteer(s) will work in the centre in Baluwatar, in the carpentry workshop.

SERC has a carpentry workshop with all the carpentry tools needed. If some materials are missing its purchase will be planned in the preparation of the mission.

SERC now has an electricity back-up system so there is not problem of load shedding to use the electric tools. They also have tools with battery.

They have internet and computers in the office room.

Volunteer(s) can use any of the material available in the centre.

Logistics:

The mission can happen anytime expect during national holidays: Dashain and Tihar (weeks 40 and 43).

Daily transportation will be done by taxi (10 to 15 minutes).
The volunteer(s) will work from 10am to 5pm from Monday to Friday. He/she can work on Sunday as well, which is a working day in Nepal.

Volunteer(s) can have lunches in the centre. Breakfasts and dinners will be taken outside in restaurants.

Comment:

SERC is looking for trainer(s) who can share their techniques in designing adapted and adaptive furniture according to needs of person with disability, and advise them on the use of new material that might be more adapted than wood and will make the utilization easier (see pictures).

The volunteer(s) might have a carpentry background and strong experience to make furniture, or strong skills in odd jobs.

Ideally the volunteer(s) has experience to make adapted furniture.

No1833 | Nepal | Organisational development | Independent Living Center for PWDs Kathmandu (CIL-Kathmandu)

Training to improve the office management of the Center for Independent Living staff members, based on implementation of an efficient computer recording system

This training will help to build the capacity of CIL-Kathmandu staff members in office management and especially in records keeping, to improve the follow up of the cases they have to handle.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

     

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

The promotion of the independent living concept in Nepal is led by young energetic people with disabilities under the leadership of Mr. Krishna Gautam, who is himself disabled.

They established the Centre for Independent Living-Kathmandu for Persons with Disabilities in 2006. Mr. Krishna Gautam got an opportunity to get acquainted with the concept of independent living during a 10 month course, the 'DUSKIN Leadership Training" in Japan.
He is passionate in the promotion of the concept of Independent living and in changing the society to one with equal opportunities for people who have severe disabilities.
He has a 15 year-long experience in the disability movement. He is the founder president of Handicapped New Life Center Banke, the first DPO (Disabled People Organisation) in the Banke district. Similarly, he was the first Regional President of the National Federation of the Disabled Nepal and is also an ex-member of the Community-Based Rehabilitation National Network. He is currently a member of the Asia Pacific Network of Independent Living, the World Disability Union and the International Independent Living Network.

The main objective behind the creation of the Centre for Independent Living organisation is to shift the paradigm of disability from charity based one to one based on rights.
It was established for the promotion and strengthening of the values, principles and practices of independent living throughout Nepal. The Independent Living Concept is a totally new concept in Nepal.
The genuine objective of the organisation is to empower Persons With Disabilities (PWDs) and to make them productive so that, although having severe disabilities, they can live with dignity and independently in their chosen community, enjoying the fullness of their human rights in a barrier free environment.

To achieve this objective, from the beginning, CIL-Kathmandu has played a key role in providing independent living skills, personal assistant services, assistive devices, employment or social security services as well as creating accessible environment in communities.
The organisation has its own principles and strategic plan to solve these issues.

It is making regular and active advocacy with the government to revise and rewrite existing laws, legislation, guidelines, policy and programmes in favour of persons with severe disabilities in Nepal.

In addition, it organizes regular activities such as peer counselling, ILP (Individual Learning Plan), PAS (Personal Assistant Service), informational and referral services to persons with disabilities and runs various types of trainings in favour of persons with disabilities.

Throughout its activities, CIL-K was able to increase the participation of PWDs in the decision making process of the government, to enhance their daily living skills and to develop role models for self advocacy.

On an annual basis, about 500 PWDs are getting direct and indirect support from CIL activities. The target groups are persons with disabilities, their parents and stakeholders.

The main funding resources of CIL-Kathmandu are the members’ fees, a fund from the Nepalese Government, Local Development Agencies, National and International donor agencies and private sectors in Nepal. CIL-K also gets some financial support from the Ministry of Women, Children and Social Welfare, Mainstream Association Japan, Asia Pacific Network of Independent Living (APNIL) and KIOS, the Finnish NGO Foundation for Human Rights.

Mainstream associations provide technical support like skill development, leadership, peer counselling, personal assistant trainings etc. They provide CIL-K trainings in Nepal as well as in Japan. They also provide an internship program.

The main target areas were initially three districts that belonged to Kathmandu valley. But realizing the need and scope of IL concept, CIL-K incorporated sister organisations working in 11 other districts of Nepal.

CIL-K employs 10 regular staff and gets punctual support from 7 volunteer staff.

To enhance and strengthen the capacity of CIL-Kathmandu staff members to produce computerized documentation/records and learn how to manage and use them.

CIL-Kathmandu staffs are involved in many different activities, case studies and participate in trainings, workshops, seminars, advocacy programs…

Due to a lack of a good recording system, a systematic way to register data and cases on software and hardcopy, they are failing to have access prompt access to information when needed.

Training in office management will allow CIL-Kathmandu staff members to improve their capacity to work more efficiently and to work as a team, by documenting activities, sharing information and foreseeing the results.

The Planète Urgence volunteers will have to intervene on different aspects of CIL-Kathmandu office management:
1. Identify all the different kind of activities of CIL-Kathmandu.
2. Identify the activities of which the staffs already have records (on paper or software)
3. Identify the activities of which there are not records.
4. Identify how and who manages these records and the use made of each ones.
5. Help the staff members to improve or create records documentation on paper/computer.
6. Create an efficient database/different database for the different types of records.
7. Train the staff members to use and update the database.
8. Create a Dropbox and train the staff members how to use it.

The Planète Urgence volunteers will make recommendations to the staff members on their methods and tools used to share information and office management.

Thanks to this training, the staff members will be more efficient in documentation recording and it will enhance their capacity to work efficiently and have a better sharing of information internally.
The training will also allow them to support more efficiently their beneficiaries and all the independent living concept activists by a well record management and a better ability to follow the cases.

Several Planète Urgence volunteers may be required to achieve all these objectives and/or 3 to 4 week missions.

The first volunteer mission will be based on the identification/audit of the actual recording system and tools used; and to help them to develop new ones and record them in computer.
A second volunteer will help them to develop an efficient database.

Participants / Name: CIL-Kathmandu staff members

Participants / Number: 15

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

The training will be for the staff members of CIL-Kathmandu. Most of them have disabilities (physical).

Participants / Training in the field request

Few of them can read and speak English well and will help for interpretation to other participants.
They have studied in higher secondary level to master degree but did not receive any specific training in office management.

Participants / Motivation

Thanks to the intervention, the staff of CIL-Kathmandu will better understand the importance of record keeping and team sharing information. They wish to improve their skills in this field to enhance the activities of the organization and smoothen their mission in long term.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

The volunteer will be welcome at airport by a staff member of CIL-Kathmandu or by Planète Urgence’s representative.

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will stay in an guest-house in Patan.

Means:

The volunteer will work in CIL-Kathmandu’s office.
Whiteboard, computers equipped with Windows XP/Windows7, video-projector, Internet connection are available in CIL-Kathmandu and available for the volunteer.

Logistics:

The mission can happen during the working time of the organization from Sunday to Friday (9 AM to 5 PM) except during special celebrations and public holidays during which the mission can't occur (in October, weeks 41, 42 and in November, week 45)

The volunteer can have lunch at the CIL office with the staff or PU office.
Other meals can be taken at the PU office on request or in restaurants.
CIL-Kathmandu office is at walking distance of PU office.

Comment:

CIL-Kathmandu needs a well experienced volunteer in the field of information and office management with knowledge of database designing.

No1815 | Nepal | Psychology | Saathi

Training in psychiatric therapy for Saathi’s women shelter staff members

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

     

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Saathi which means “friend” in Nepali was established in 1992 by 8 devoted young women to address the contemporary challenges faced by Nepali women. Some of them had just finished their studies while some were working in Ngo, Ingo, media and schools.

At the time this organization was created, the concept of Violence against Women and Girls (VAW&G) was an issue the Nepali legislators, leaders, social workers and statesmen were half aware of. On the contrary, violence against women, particularly domestic violence or battery against women in Nepal was never considered a cause of concern by the Nepali authorities. Violence inflicted upon women within the four walls was accepted as traditional practice. SAATHI was therefore a pioneer organization to come forward and demand right and opportunities for women.

Saathi’s mission is to continue its work in the area of domestic violence and to carry on its fight to safeguard women and children against abuse and coercion, and to empower women and children through the promotion of gender equity and equality based development.

Saathi’s objectives:
• Elimination of injustice and violence against woman in Nepal and provision of support to victims and their children.
• Elimination of violence and injustice against children and the provision of support to victimized and needy children.

Saathi’s mission:
• Collect data through research and the identification of social issue related to urban and rural woman of Nepal.
• Build the capacity of women through awareness raising and skill training.
• Develop and implement plans of action in order to improve the present status of Nepali women and children.
• Work as a pressure group to lobby and pressurize concerned authorities to take the required steps for the advancement of women and children.

Since its start, Saathi has been involved in many awareness programs, advocacy, video shows and talk programs, radio jingles, poster competition for the general public or production and dissemination of IEC (Information, Education, and Communication) materials. To provide relief and support to the victims Saathi has been persistent in generating various life skills opportunities and training to empower and make the victims residing in its shelter independent.

In order to get an in-depth picture of violence prevalent in the Nepali society, Satthi conducted a nationwide survey and on its basis published the research titled “Psycho- social impacts of violence against women with special focus on rape, incest and polygamy” in 1997. The research-highlighted areas that require serious consideration therefore Saathi have been working to design programs and training in accordance to the pressing requirements of the victims.

Currently Saathi offers a wide range of support programs to women and children at risk in Nepal:
• Ashreya Shivir Rehabilitation Centre in Kathmandu for battered and sexually abused women and children.
• Drop-in Centre for Street Children in Kathmandu, a refuge for abused children, street children and orphans.
• Cross Border Programme in Terai, to combat trafficking of women and children and to rehabilitate at-risk and rescued women.
• Saathi Banke Shelter is a shelter for women and children victim of domestic violence and conflict, located in Banke district.
• Women's Skill Training for income generation.
• Cabin Restaurant Support Programme, working to eliminate exploitation of waitresses.
• Child Educational Scholarship Programmes for children victim of violence.
• Social Mobilisation Groups working with local communities: VDC (Village Development Centre), Police, government bodies, national football players, perpetrators, legal representatives and funder INGOs are involved and peer counseling is done to bring about change in the mind of the people.
Saathi, as a key organization, is also pressing for the implementation of existing laws and the formation of new laws to protect women and children against violence and exploitation.

So far SAATHI women shelter has already supported more than 1000 women and 336 children.

Saathi’s strategy is to work at all levels of Nepali society - from the government to the grassroots level. At the policy level, Saathi has been involved, as partner, in drafting key legislation regarding domestic violence and is advocating for the passage of such a bill in the capital. Saathi is also involved in the women’s movement to improve the status of women in Nepal. Recognizing the need to particularly reach the grassroots level in order to achieve its goals, Saathi has established branch offices in the Banke and Bardiya districts of Western Nepal. These Branch offices work towards eliminating violence against women and children and community development and also support women and children victimized by armed conflict. Saathi has recently started working in the area of cross-border trafficking of women and children.

To enable the staff members of the shelter to improve their knowledge in psychiatric therapy to provide a better support to the residents of the shelter.

The staff members of Saathi’s women shelter have to deal with women victim of physical, sexual or psychological violence. These women suffer from deep trauma, have crisis or none appropriate behaviours. The shelter does have a counselor, but none of the staff of the shelter received any training in this field, to enable to support those women in an appropriate way.

Nepal is a patriarchal and male-dominated society where women are always looked down.
Domestic violence is considered as a simple family problem that has to be solved internally and no interference is accepted.
In such a situation woman remain silent for a long time although suffering from violence, which affects them mentally and emotionally. Even if the survivors are rescued with the help from local bodies and social workers, they are unable, scared and petrified to express themselves.

In such cases, the support of a psychiatric therapist is essential to help them to open up and confess their problems.

According to one of Saathi board member’s experiences, who has been dealing and observing the women of Saathi shelter for quite some time, a training by a trained psychiatric therapist could help the staff of the shelter to overcome the survivors’ mental and emotional instability and to develop strong will power to face the future with stable mind.

Saathi would like a female psychiatric therapist with as far as possible experiences in Domestic Violence.

The Planète Urgence volunteer’s intervention will allow the staff members to know how to manage residents’ crisis or none appropriate behaviors and better understand them. Sometimes the victims are so much traumatized that the regular counselor is not able to convince them to open up and share their problems.

The skills, knowledge, methods transferred by the Planète Urgence volunteer will allow the staff members to make the residents express themselves and feel better, to give emergency counseling for some special cases and avoid failure in family reintegration, which often leads some women to return regularly in the shelter.

The Planète Urgence volunteer could give theoretical skills to the staff members and support them in view of concrete cases.

The Planète Urgence volunteer will help the staff of the shelter to detect and understand unusual behaviors or uneasiness.

She will give them advices on the way to answer this kind of issues, the way to react, how they can support them more efficiently.

After the mission, the shelter wishes to be able to support the survivors to develop self confidence, courage, and motivation to do something in the future that will lead them to a better life.

Participants / Name: Staff of the shelter

Participants / Number: 5

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

Staff of the women’s shelter is: 1 coordinator, 1 supervisor, 1 field worker, 2 wardens, all women from 20 to 40 years old.

Participants / Training in the field request

The staff of the shelter is able to speak and read English. Some residents can speak too.
They studied from SLC (secondary level) to Master degree.

Participants / Motivation

The staff of the shelter would like to get training in this field to learn how to manage the residents and help them more to face their trauma.
It will help the staff of the shelter to feel more confident to support the residents and to be more efficient regarding their work and their support function in the organization.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

The volunteer will be welcome by a staff member of Saathi.

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will stay in a Guest House in the area of Sanepa, near the women shelter and near the head office as well.

Means:

The Planète Urgence volunteer will work in Saathi women shelter.

One computer without internet connection, CD player, computer speakers, TV, DVD player are available in the shelter and available for the volunteer.

Logistics:

The staff of the shelter is working every day except on Saturday from 9am to 5pm. The Planète Urgence volunteer will have Saturday and Sunday off.

The intervention of the volunteer will be between 9 am and 5pm, 3 or 4 hours a day.

The mission can happen anytime except during special celebrations and public holiday (in October, weeks 41, 42 and in November, week 45)

The volunteer will have lunch at the shelter with the staff and the residents and other meals will be taken at the guest house or in restaurants.
A taxi will be arranged for daily transportation from the hotel to the shelter.

Comment:

Saathi would like a female psychiatric therapist with as far as possible experiences in Domestic Violence.

No2069 | Nepal | Psychology | Antardristi Nepal

Training in dance therapy and body language for kids and youths for Antardristi’s staff members

This training in dance therapy and body expression/language will allow building the capacity of Antardristi’s staff directly in contact with children and young women victim of sexual abuse within their family or community, in order to ensure a quality psychosocial support.

Select a date below to add it to your application for a STVA.

     

HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Antardristi was established by a group of Nepali women in 2003. They started the NGO after their visit to a police station that highlighted that the cases of sexual abuse and their victims were given very little consideration. Indeed, anytime a case of sexual abuse is registered, nobody would seem to be able to address the child or woman’s mental state. Therefore, the founders of Antardristi decided to work on sexual abuse issues by providing psychological care to children and young women, among other things.

Antardristi’s mission is to prevent sexual abuse of children and young women and promote improved mental health among minors. It facilitates community outreach activities for teachers, students and communities of Nepal. Antardristi seeks to raise awareness in schools and dispel traditional perceptions such as blaming the victim. It aims to foster social change in the area of mental health, in which the individual is often stigmatized. The organization also empowers and supports child survivors of sexual abuse through psychosocial counseling.
Antardristi also understands the need for reaching out to adult survivors of sexual abuse (SA) in order to support them in an adequate manner and prevent any further re-victimization as well as enable them to heal from the impact of sexual abuse.

The goals of Antardristi are:
- to raise awareness of, empower against and hence prevent sexual abuse,
- to provide psychological and rehabilitative intervention for families and survivors impacted by sexual abuse,
- to provide outreach and support community integration, following the process of rehabilitation.

The current activities of Antardristi are:
- Awareness programs in schools, communities in Kaski, Syangja, Myagdi, Makwanpur Chitwan and Jhapa,
- 1 day teacher training in Kaski, Syangja, Myagdi, Makwampur, Chitwan and Jhapa,
- General campaigns and street drama to raise awareness on the issue of SA in Kaski, Syangja, Myagdi, Makwampur, Chitwan and Jhapa,
- Psychosocial and rehabilitative interventions for families and children and young women impacted by sexual abuse. Antardristi has 2 centers and one transit home. The transit home in Kathmandu has been opened in 2007, one center in Pokhara opened in 2008 and one in Hetauda opened in 2010. 3 children/young women can be accommodated in Kathmandu, 15 children/young women in Pokhara and 20 children/young women in Hetauda.

By November 2014, Antardristi has rescued 15 children from different part of Nepal and has reintegrated 6 children into their home. Those children whose family reintegration is not possible were sent to Antardristi network organizations.
Antardristi is getting funds from Danida (Denmark's development cooperation) for its awareness program for 2 years. For the survivors, Antardristi is getting funds from individual donors both national and international.

Antardristi is operating its programs in 20 districts of the 75 of Nepal and received cases from 20 different districts from far Western region of Nepal to Eastern regions.

Antardristi employs 14 staff and 2 part times.

To train the counselor, outreach coordinators, residential in charge from the safe home, program manager and reintegration officer of Antardristi on dance therapy and body language for kids and young women.

Antardristi is working in a really taboo sector, especially in Nepal, which does not help to treat the cases; the staff is really interested to offer an efficient and adapted psychosocial support to these children and young women, whose the trauma is really deep.

As Antardristi is working with sexually abuse children and young women this training will help its staff to make their beneficiaries describe and express their and traumas more easily and therefore decrease their anxiety.

Antardristi has experimented, while working with children and young women, that only doing counseling sometimes is not enough to disclose the traumas. The team believes that it will be easier if they offer the possibility for their beneficiaries to express their feelings in a different way, without speaking.

It will help them to work more efficiently by using a different kind of therapy.*

The participants to the training will be the staff directly in contact with the identified cases; as the counselor, the reintegration officer, the program manager and the residential in charge of the safe home.
The outreach workers are the people who are giving awareness classes in different areas of Nepal. While giving these awareness classes they also find out cases so their participation in the training is as well really important and will allow them to provide initial counseling there also.
The residential in charge of the safe home will be able to establish a follow-up thought dance therapy and body language, and the improvements will be readable with a therapy indicator tool.

At the end of the mission Antardristi expects that:
- The staff will feel more confident in their work and they hope to be able to identify quicker the root cause of the traumas via an analysis of the body expression/language of the cases as no words are so clear as the language of body expression; therefore the support to the cases will be provided as soon as they are identified, to reduce their pain, anxiety and their unsafe feelings,
- The staff will be able to develop and organize dance and body expression activities,
- The staff will be able to analyze children behavior and suffering through dance therapy and body expression activities,
- The staff will be able to assess the changes and improvements of the children.

The trainer will train the staff of Antardristi on:
- Theoretical skills about body expression/language, how to develop dance/body therapy practices, how to assess changes and establish a follow-up,
- Practical dance/body therapy sessions to allow Antardristi staff to conduct themselves this kind of activities.

Participants / Name: The mission will be organized for 7 staff of Antardristi.

Participants / Number: 7

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

They are 6 women and 1 man, between 28 to 42 years old: 1 counselor, 2 outreach coordinators, 2 residential in charge from the centers, 1 program manager and 1 reintegration officer.

They all speak English.

Participants / Training in the field request

- Yogita Chapagain, Master in Sociology (program manager)
- Ramchandra Lamichhane, Master in Public Health, running (outreach coordinator)
- Samikshya Bhujel, Master in Account running (residential in charge)
- Megha Magar, Diploma in Account (Reintegration Officer)
- Rajani Bharati, Master in Psychology running (counselor )
- Rina Shrestha, Diploma in Sociology (outreach coordinator)
- Kalpana Sharma, School level Certificate (residential in charge)

Antardrist staff has never received this kind of training.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

A staff will welcome the volunteer at the airport. It will take between 30 to 45 minutes to reach Antardristi head office in Patan and/or reach the accommodation on the first day according to flight schedule.
The second day the volunteer will go by jeep with the team to Hetauda, which is at a 4 hours drive from Kathmandu (district of Makwanpur).

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will be accommodated with the team in a rented home in Hetauda. The volunteer will have to share a room with one woman staff. There will be no attached bathroom. There will be electricity, but not 24 hours as Nepal experiences power cuts every day for 2 hours on average. The volunteer can use an Internet connection in the safe house.

Means:

The volunteer will work in one of the Antardristi safe home where abused children are accommodated, in Hetauda, out of Kathmandu valley. Mostly there will be 18 to 20 children. Most of the children will be in school from 10 am to 4 pm.
This place has a white board, computers with windows XP, an Internet connection and video-projector.

Logistics:

The volunteer will work from Sunday to Friday from 10 am to 4 pm with flexibility. The volunteer can work on Saturdays as well.

The mission can happen anytime of the year except during the festival of Tihar and Dashain, in weeks 43 and 46 in 2015.

From the accommodation place, the volunteer will come to the safe home with the staff by walking; it will take 5 minutes.

The volunteer will have the meals at the safe home with the team. At 9 o'clock the volunteer can have Nepali lunch, which is rice, vegetable, pickle and lentil soup, at 2 o'clock the volunteer will have snacks and at 7.30pm the volunteer will have dinner. If the volunteer wants to have lunch outside of the safe house, he/she can but will have to inform the staff in advance.

Comment:

Antardristi would like a professional in dance therapy and body expression/language assessment, expert in the relevant domain.

No1820 | Nepal | Knitting / Sewing / Embroidery | Children and Youth First (CYF)

Advance training in stitching for the 14 women of the project and their trainer.

This training will help the women part of the project and their trainer to improve their skills in stitching: increase the quality of the products, increase the sales and so their income/CYF income. It will also allow them to learn to produce new product as clothes, curtain, cushion, school uniform...

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HistoryObjectivesVolunteer interventionMissionParticipants

Children and Youth First (CYF) was created in 2009 by Haushala Thapa at the age of 21 when she found the need to give chidren the access to education.

Haushala Thapa first got involved in social work field when she participated and led a campaign at the age of 15 against eve teasing and harassment towards girls, a project that was then run by SAVE THE CHILDREN UK. Then after a year she got the opportunity to work with street children and create a drama along with the street children in 2002.
She then completed her bachelor’s degree in social work from Nepal and also worked with the government of Nepal under the Central Child Welfare Board for the lost and found children department as a project manager for a year.

CYF was created when Haushala rescued 14 children from an orphanage that was keeping the children in the worst condition, for the benefit of the manager.

CYF addresses issues that are directly related to children, families and women who have minimal access to education and are economically challenged.

To work with these issues, the organisation has a school based in Kausaltar Bhaktapur called “LIFE VISION ACADEMY” that helps to educate children from economically challenged families or broken homes with abusive parents, by providing them hostel facility.
The school also provides education to children who come from families that cannot bear the minimal cost for their education, by helping to sustain the school’s expenditure.

CYF helps to provide quality education to these children, with the use of practical tools for education and child-teacher participation.

Beneficiary children are either identified by CYF or referred to the organisation by local organisations or friends as needing immediate attention.
During the identification process, CYF interviews the child’s responsible guardian, collects their history and problem of why the organisation needs to support the child. They collect information of the child as well on his/her medical conditions, if he/she has been abused physically or sexually. Then the guardians, who are the blood related relatives or single parents sign a responsibility agreement where they must visit their child once a month and support their child’s education by buying stationeries’ or anything that a child would need in school. CYF does this in order to create a sense of responsibility and attachment with the child.
CYF’s work is to support the child for education that is not just based on text books but also practical, at the same time the organisation makes sure their guardians are working and raising their living standards.

The beneficiary children mainly come from remote areas of Nepal, mostly from the Sindhupalchowk and Solukhumbu area.

To date, CYF provides education to 32 underprivileged children through hostel facility and has also been able to set up a skill training space for the children’s mothers and women who want to work.

CYF currently works on enhancing and bringing quality to the education it has been providing to the children, working on “how” to teach children practically and not just via their books.

Another activity is the skill training project which was started in January 2013: CYF provides knitting, craft making and stitching training to mainly mothers of the children supported by the organisation and to women/youth who come from economically challenged backgrounds. CYF currently has 2 trainers for knitting and stitching and 8 to 15 women are trained in a month.

CYF currently supports directly and indirectly 60 people (children, women and teachers).

Activities are funded with the help of friends and family living in the United Kingdom, United States and via a branch organisation that has been setup in Austria. Friends and family help the organisation by sponsoring a child or by helping to buy materials needed for the school and CYF also supports activities by organising various fundraising events in Kathmandu and abroad. Recently CYF has also been able to support some activities by the sales of handmade products.

To improve the skills in stitching of the women part of the project and their trainer, to produce higher quality products and gain time.
The stitching trainer get a training a long time ago and is doing this work more by passion. She also needs to increase her skills and so be able to train and support the actual women part of the project and the future ones.
By increasing the quality of the products CYF hopes to increase their sales which will be benefit for the women and for the organization to invest in machines, buy more fabric and accessories and in the future open a shop.

In August 2014, two volunteers have developed a collection of products in Dhaka (local fabric) and synthetic leather:
- Mac book case ;
- i-pad case ;
- travelling bag ;
- tote bag ;
- passport case ;
- purse.

CYF is exporting these products and the quality has to be really high. The volunteer gave them tips to improve their stitching techniques, however the women still do have quality issues. The quality of these products could be therefore improved by a proper training in this matter.
From the profit of the sales of these new products, CYF has invested in two new electrical sewing machines. The women are not use to work in this type of machine and do not know all the possibility that it offer them.

CYF is looking for a volunteer to build the capacity of the women and their trainer in stitching with a global approach:
? - Different hands/mechanical machine points,
? - Work on electrical machine and it options,
? - Type of point according to the fabric,
? - Make patterns,
? - Quality control,
? - Cutting,
? - ...
?
? CYF also would like the volunteer to help the trainer to create a training book for the actual producers and the future women who could be part of the production.

? After this mission CYF hope the women and their trainer will make higher quality product and have better skills in stitching to diversify their production (example: curtain, cushion, school uniform...).
?
? The first volunteer will have to evaluate the actual level of the trainer and the women and start to create a book of all the technique they already practising and the new ones.

Few volunteers might be required.

Participants / Name: Stitching trainer and women involved in production

Participants / Number: 14

Participants / Education level, Diplomas

This mission is organised for the stitching trainer of CYF and for the 14 women part of the production (some are the children’s mother supported by CYF’s school).

5 direct beneficiaries, 14 indirect beneficiaries (potentially part of the training).

Participants / Training in the field request

They can understand English but for the training CYF will ask a local volunteer to help for the translation if needed.
They have a school lever equivalent to middle school, under SLC (équivalent Seconde).

Participants / Motivation

They would like to take part of the training to increase their stitching skills, improve the quality of the products and so increase their income.
In the future they could be able to open their own shop or to find a job in a factory.

Airport: Kathmandu [tribhuvan]

Transfer to the mission site:

The volunteer will be welcome at the airport by a staff of CYF.

Accommodation & food:

The volunteer will stay in a Guest House in the area of Sanepa, near Children Youth First office and factory.

Means:

A white board, a computer with internet, a printer, two stitching mechanic machines and two stitching electrical machines are available in the workshop and available for the volunteer.

CYF has a stock of used clothes for the bags or dolls’ production, which can be used for the training.

Logistics:

Volunteer will work in the “workshop” in CYF office in Sanepa, Lalitpur.

5/6 women are working from Saturday to Wednesday (5 days a week) in office, 6 hours a day.
8/9 are working from home.

For the training all the women interested by the training will be in office to attend the training.

The trainer is available 5 days a week too, 7 hours a day. Saturday from 10m to 4pm and the other days from 8.30am to 2.30pm.

The mission can happen anytime except during special celebrations and public holiday (in October, weeks 41, 42 and in November, week 45).

The volunteer will have lunch at CYF office with the staff and the women and other meals will be taken at the guest house or in restaurants.

CYF office is at walking distance from the guest house.

Comment:

Children and Youth First would like a professional in stitching or someone with high skills in stitching, able to train the women and their trainer in a pedagogic way and on mechanic and electrical machines.

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